In the first part of this paper, I clear the ground from frequent misconceptions of the relationship between fact and value by examining some uses of the adjective “natural” in ethical controversies. Such uses bear evidence to our “natural” tendency to regard nature (considered in a descriptive sense, as the complex of physical and biological regularities) as the source of ethical norms. I then try to account for the origins of this tendency by offering three related explanations, the most important of which is evolutionistic: if any behaviour that favours our equilibrium with the environment is potentially adaptive, nothing can be more effective for this goal than developing an attitude toward the natural world that considers it as a dispenser of sacred norms that must be invariably respected. By referring to the Aristotelian notion of human flourishing illustrated in the first part of the paper, in the second I discuss some ethical problems raised by mini-chips implantable in our bodies. I conclude by defending their potential beneficial effects of such new technological instruments.

Dorato, M. (2015). The Naturalness of the Naturalistic Fallacy and the Ethics of Nanotechnology. In S.O. Hansson (a cura di), The Role of Technology in Science: Philosophical Perspectives (pp. 207-224). Dordrecht : Springer Science&Business Media [10.1007/978-94-017-9762-7_11].

The Naturalness of the Naturalistic Fallacy and the Ethics of Nanotechnology

DORATO, Mauro
2015

Abstract

In the first part of this paper, I clear the ground from frequent misconceptions of the relationship between fact and value by examining some uses of the adjective “natural” in ethical controversies. Such uses bear evidence to our “natural” tendency to regard nature (considered in a descriptive sense, as the complex of physical and biological regularities) as the source of ethical norms. I then try to account for the origins of this tendency by offering three related explanations, the most important of which is evolutionistic: if any behaviour that favours our equilibrium with the environment is potentially adaptive, nothing can be more effective for this goal than developing an attitude toward the natural world that considers it as a dispenser of sacred norms that must be invariably respected. By referring to the Aristotelian notion of human flourishing illustrated in the first part of the paper, in the second I discuss some ethical problems raised by mini-chips implantable in our bodies. I conclude by defending their potential beneficial effects of such new technological instruments.
Dorato, M. (2015). The Naturalness of the Naturalistic Fallacy and the Ethics of Nanotechnology. In S.O. Hansson (a cura di), The Role of Technology in Science: Philosophical Perspectives (pp. 207-224). Dordrecht : Springer Science&Business Media [10.1007/978-94-017-9762-7_11].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/172169
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