Plasma screens, portable players, computers, videophones, handhelds: moving images are no longer designed for just one technical support, nor do they impose on spectators a single viewing style. If for the entire 20th century people attended films following a precise ritual inherited from the live theatre, silent and sedate in the darkness of the auditorium, today this tie between movies and movie theatres seems less crucial every day. Moving images are everywhere and seem to follow us in our daily lives, at home as in public places or transit. How do films change to adapt to this new situation? And, above all, how has the experience of those who watch changed? Facing one of the decisive transformations in the history of Western aesthetics, from the Renaissance until today, In Broad Daylight attempts to investigate films in the age of individual media to reason about the metamorphosis of a spectator increasingly free but also increasingly loath to let himself be truly moved by the images flashing before him. A revolution of the gaze that is remodeling the entire system of the arts and is destined to profoundly shape contemporary creativity in all its manifestations. Without regret but also without facile euphoria, In Broad Daylight is the first study on an international level entirely dedicated to the picture house as aesthetic device. Moving freely from philosophy of mind to film theory, from architectural practice to ethics, from Shakespeare to Aristotle, from Leon Battista Alberti to Orson Welles, Gabriele Pedullà’s book is also the occasion to rethink some of the hottest issues in contemporary reflections on cinema and art. Can we give credence to psychoanalytic theses on the effects of that movie theatre Roland Barthes called the “dark cube”? Or might the wisdom of architects be more useful to us? How pertinent are Walter Benjamin’s theories on “reception in a state of distraction”? Do the different media each have their own moral sense? Is the television really immoral? Does the attitude we hold as television viewers resemble that of movie customers before the institutionalization of the picture house? In the epoch of individual media, is there still space for an art that isn’t just entertainment but seeks to profoundly stir its spectators? Will technology bring about the death of tragedy announced by George Steiner and so many others? In Broad Daylight tries to answer questions like these, with the conviction that only by observing the present within a much longer chronological sequence will we truly comprehend the changes we’ve seen in recent years. A story that began five hundred years ago, in Palladio’s Italy, or perhaps even earlier, in the Athens of the great tragedians, is coming to a definitive close. The only way to avoid passive subjugation to the epochal metamorphosis of aesthetic experience as such is to completely understand it. Synopsis I. The Cave and the Mirror Chapter I, “The Cave and the Mirror,” discusses the absence of the movie theatre in film theory, pointing out how the great film theorists’ strategies have neglected the capital role that architecture and place played in spectator experience throughout the 20th century. Exactly as the contemporary art gallery – the so-called “white cube” – promoted a certain type of painting, “constructing” a new kind of public and collector completely different from those of previous centuries, the “dark cube” (the theatre auditorium, as coined by Roland Barthes) accompanied and protected a very particular type of film and decisively conditioned filmmaking’s development. II. Towards the Dark Cube Through an extensive first-hand investigation of the era’s American and European press, the second chapter (“Towards the Dark Cube”) concentrates on the first twenty years of the cinema’s life, when projections happened in chaotic, overflowing, and often too brightly lit spaces and films had to seek hospitality from the least respectable halls of entertainment. The coexistence of diverse viewing styles would continue long after the first bona fide movie theatres appeared, so long that only with the advent of the talkie would the new art definitively adopt the rules of dramatic theatres (silence, immobility, dark, strict separation from the outside world, etc.), ending its relationship with the world of the fair and the café chantant and acquiring the social recognition it had until then been denied. III. Vitruvius’ Sons The third chapter widens the scale of inquiry. First, it shows how the picture house derives from the theatrical auditorium designed by the humanist-architects of the Italian Renaissance. Studying the works of Vitruvius, in sixteenth century Italy the inventors of modern theatre architecture wanted above all to create a new kind of spectator: a spectator very different from the one that attended the medieval street farces and sacred representations. In this project one can see the desire to strengthen control over the public and introduce it to a new form of art – the modern tragedy – and to lead it to a new secularized, but absolute, form of aestethic experience by applying Aristotle’s precepts about katharsis. Better than any other texts, the works of the Renaissance architects (compared to the works of twentieth century architects, who followed their paths) teach us how the space, the building, can influence the aesthetic response of the audience. Following their intuitions, for centuries thespians had tried to use architecture to discipline the audience and protect it from distractions, but only the movie theatre completely realized their dream. IV. The Age of Freedom “The Age of Freedom” begins to analyze the disappearance of the link between moving images and movie theatres in the 20th century, when architecture helped to stabilize audience attention, but refutes the idea that the current situation can be simply described as a return to the days of the cine-fair or variety cinema. After having discussed (and confuted) Walter Benjamin’s celebrated theory of “reception in a state of distraction,” which would be applied to any cinematographic spectacle, the fourth chapter is dedicated to the ways contemporary individual media do not just allow but actually deliberately promote a more superficial and rhapsodic engagement with films. Though at the theatre or movies the audience voluntarily submits to a regime of necessity, at home the remote control allows us to move while remaining immobile: in other words, to seek quicker satisfaction elsewhere, giving in at any moment to boredom or simple curiosity to peek at the program on the next channel. All it takes is a push of the button and the scene radically changes before our eyes, because the forced immobility of the theatre auditorium is replaced with a particularly intoxicating simulation of movement that places us at the center of a universe of sounds and colors ready to change at our pleasure. Finally there’s no need to even get up: planted in our comfortable chair (but always free to say, “enough”), it’s the world that changes as we wish it to, taking us from one stage to another, near and far at the same time, with a light touch of the thumb. V. The Aesthetics of the Shark The fifth chapter, “The Aesthetics of the Shark,” explores the effect of the metamorphosis of the public (now used to seeing moving images increasingly rarely at the movie theatre) on new releases. To please the new spectators, producers imagine amphibious films capable of working on multiple technological supports. In the average Hollywood movies of the last thirty years, editing has become continuously faster; long throw lenses encourage brusque focus changes; close-ups become the standard mode of shooting any conversation scene; the camera moves with a speed that was once unthinkable; digital technology allows retouching frames down to the minutest detail; screenplays reject the slow but steady development of the classic cinema to instead take viewers on a roller coaster ride. In all probability these changes are born of the need to capture the attention of a spectator who – thanks to the remote control and home screen – can decide to switch from one program to another at whim and for this reason must be drawn in with appeals to instinct and increasingly elementary and Pavlovian mechanisms (fear, desire, enchantment...). VI. Desdemona Must Die Why is the transformation of viewing styles today so impotant? And how is the aesthetic experience changing under the influence of individual media? To answer these questions “Desdemona Must Die” moves from a seminal essay by American philosopher Stanley Cavell, perhaps the only scholar who has constructed a whole theory of theatre upon the spectator’s imprisonment during a show. According to Cavell, the special experience we have at the theatre is closely tied to the absence of freedom. We suffer with the characters because we cannot do anything to interfere in the dramatic action; it is our physical confinement that enables such emotional transfer, because we feel – in our very bodies – the force of tragic necessity. The theatre’s morality is also a result of such constriction because learning that we cannot help the men and women on stage (we cannot save Desdemona from Othello) also teaches us that this impossibility is exactly what separates going to the theatre from living our real lives – where we can (and should) take action to change the world around us. This was the nature of the drama’s moral teaching in the Western tradition, but the rise of individual media threatens this nexus between aesthetic pleasure, tragic pain, and ethics. Are we witnessing the death of tragedy? VII. Low-Impact Catharsis The seventh and final chapter, “Low-Impact Catharsis,” reflects on the future of the cinema and cinephelia in a world where films have changed because spectators and, even more importantly, the viewing conditions offered by technology have as well. The danger is that films are transformed into long music videos, also because less talented contemporary directors are satisfied simply to keep the audience in their grip. Is the great cinema dead with the marginalization of the movie house, as Susan Sontag prophesied a few years ago? Perhaps, to be less pessimistic, the current metamorphosis only indicates the end of a particular idea of cinema. It’s still too soon to tell. The only certainty, at this point, is that today’s moving images and spectators have set off down an unbeaten path and are putting up for discussion all that we thought we knew about the film experience and its place in the system of the arts.

Schermi al plasma, lettori portatili, computer, videofonini, palmari: già da qualche anno gli audiovisivi non vengono più pensati per un solo supporto tecnologico, né impongono agli spettatori un unico stile di visione. Se per tutto il XX secolo gli uomini hanno assistito ai film secondo un preciso rituale ereditato dal teatro, silenziosi e composti nel buio della sala, oggi questo legame tra il cinema (come arte) e il cinema (come luogo) appare ogni giorno meno necessario. Le immagini in movimento sono ovunque e sembrano inseguirci nelle nostre esistenze quotidiane, a casa come nei locali pubblici o sui mezzi di trasporto. Come cambiano le pellicole per adattarsi a questa nuova situazione? E come è cambiata, soprattutto, l’esperienza di colui che guarda? Di fronte a uno dei mutamenti decisivi nella storia dell’estetica occidentale, dal Rinascimento a oggi, In piena luce prova a interrogarsi sui film nell’epoca degli individual media e delle “passioni fredde”, per ragionare sulla metamorfosi di uno spettatore sempre più libero ma anche sempre più restio a lasciarsi coinvolgere veramente dai fotogrammi che scorrono davanti ai suoi occhi. Una rivoluzione dello sguardo che sta riplasmando l’intero sistema delle arti e che è destinata a segnare profondamente la creatività contemporanea in tutte le sue manifestazioni. Senza rimpianti ma anche senza facili euforie, In piena luce è in assoluto il primo studio a livello internazionale interamente consacrato alla sala cinematografica come dispositivo estetico. Spaziando dalla filosofia della mente alla teoria del cinema, dalla pratica architettonica alla filosofia morale, da Shakespeare ad Aristotele, questo volume è anche l’occasione per ripensare alcuni dei nodi più scottanti della riflessione contemporanea sul cinema e sulle arti. Possiamo dare credito alle tesi degli psicoanalisti sugli effetti di quel movie theater che Roland Barthes chiamava “dark cube”? O invece ci è più utile il sapere degli architetti? Quanto sono pertinenti le teorie di Walter Benjamin sulla “fruizione nella distrazione”? Esiste una specifica moralità dei diversi medium? La televisione è davvero immorale? Il nostro atteggiamento di spettatori televisivi assomiglia a quello degli avventori delle origini, prima dell’istituzionalizzazione del cinema? Nell’epoca degli individual media c’è ancora spazio per un’arte che non sia solo intrattenimento ma che intenda scuotere profondamente gli spettatori? La morte della tragedia annunciata da George Steiner e da tanti altri studiosi è sul punto di consumarsi per effetto della tecnologia? In piena luce prova a rispondere a interrogativi come questi, nella convinzione che soltanto osservando il presente all’interno di una più lunga sequenza cronologica i cambiamenti degli ultimi anni diventano davvero comprensibili. Una storia cominciata cinquecento anni fa, nell’Italia di Palladio, o forse ancora prima, nell’Atene dei grandi tragici, si sta definitivamente chiudendo. Ma tanto più per questo l’unico modo per non subire passivamente questa trasformazione è prendere al più presto consapevolezza della metamorfosi epocale che sta investendo l’esperienza estetica in quanto tale. I. Il primo capitolo, ‘La caverna e lo specchio’, ripercorre la storia dell’assenza della sala nell’estetica novecentesca e si sofferma sulle strategie attraverso cui i grandi teorici del cinema hanno rimosso o trascurato il ruolo capitale che gli spazi e le architetture ha svolto nell’esperienza degli spettatori lungo tutto il XX secolo. Esattamente come la galleria d’arte contemporanea - il così detto “white cube” - ha promosso un tipo particolare di pittura, “costruendo” un collezionista e un pubblico completamente diverso da quello dei secoli precedenti, allo stesso modo il “cubo opaco” (la sala, secondo una felice definizione di Roland Barthes) ha accompagnato e protetto un tipo particolarissimo di pellicole e ha condizionato in maniera decisiva gli sviluppi dell’arte del film. II. Attraverso un’ampia ricognizione di prima mano della stampa europea e statunitense del tempo, nel secondo capitolo (‘Verso il cubo opaco’) il discorso si concentra sui primi venti anni di vita del cinema, quando le proiezioni avvenivano in luoghi caotici, affollati e spesso troppo illuminati e i film dovevano chiedere ospitalità alle meno rispettabili forme di intrattenimento. La coesistenza tra diverse modalità di fruizione sarebbe durata ancora a lungo dopo l’affermarsi delle prime vere e proprie sale cinematografiche, al punto che solo con l’avvento del sonoro la nuova arte avrebbe adottato definitivamente le regole del teatro (silenzio, immobilità, buio, netta separazione dal mondo esterno, ecc…), tagliando i rapporti con l’universo della fiera e dei cafè chantant e avviandosi a quel riconoscimento sociale che sino a quel momento le era stato negato. III. ‘I figli di Vitruvio’ stabilisce una precisa correlazione tra la trasformazione dei luoghi del cinema, alla metà degli anni Dieci, e l’affermarsi internazionale del film narrativo di due ore al posto delle brevi pellicole che avevano dominato il mercato sino a quel momento. Dalle testimonianze degli architetti che nei primi decenni del secolo hanno inventato la forma della sala cinematografica novecentesca emerge chiaramente come dietro alla loro adozione del modello del “teatro all’italiana” ci fosse la volontà di favorire un tipo particolare di intrattenimento. Il cinema doveva occupare il ruolo una volta detenuto dal grande teatro di prosa e per questo aveva bisogno di uno spazio adatto alle nuove opere. Significativamente, come gli architetti italiani del Rinascimento che hanno concepito i primi edifici teatrali non effimeri si erano preoccupati di disegnare un luogo per gli spettacoli che aiutasse il pubblico ad apprezzare il repertorio drammaturgico greco e romano da poco recuperato, anche i loro eredi novecenteschi hanno visto nelle proprie costruzioni un contributo a un cinema distante dagli cortometraggi dei primissimi anni almeno quanto le tragedie e le commedie classiciste del Cinquecento lo erano dalle farse e dalle sacre rappresentazioni medievali. Attraverso gli spazi il sogno aristotelico di un’arte in grado di sconvolgere e trasformare gli spettatori è passato così alla nuova arte. IV. ‘Gli audiovisivi della libertà’ comincia ad analizzare l’attuale venir meno del nesso novecentesco tra le immagini in movimento e la sala cinematografica, quando l’architettura contribuiva a stabilizzare l’attenzione dei presenti, ma rifiuta l’idea che la situazione attuale possa essere descritta semplicemente come un ritorno alla cine-fiera e al cine-varietà delle origini. Dopo aver discusso (e confutato) la celebre teoria di Walter Benjamin sulla “ricezione nella distrazione” che accompagnerebbe qualsiasi spettacolo cinematografico, il quarto capitolo si sofferma invece sul modo in cui gli individual media contemporanei non solo consentono ma addirittura promuovono in maniera deliberata un coinvolgimento più superficiale e rapsodico. Mentre al teatro e al cinema il pubblico si sottopone volontariamente a un rigoroso regime di necessità, il cambiacanali ci consente di spostarci rimanendo immobili: in altre parole di cercare altrove una fonte di soddisfazione più rapida, cedendo all’istante di noia o alla semplice curiosità di sbirciare quale programma danno sulla rete accanto. E’ sufficiente premere un tasto e la scena davanti ai nostri occhi si trasformerà radicalmente, perché all’immobilità forzata della sala si è sostituita una simulazione di movimento particolarmente inebriante, che ci colloca al centro di un universo di suoni e di colori pronto a mutare a nostro piacimento. Finalmente non c’è nemmeno più bisogno di alzarsi: fermi nella nostra comoda poltrona (ma sempre liberi di dire basta) è il mondo che cambia a nostro piacimento, portandoci da un palcoscenico all’altro con una semplice pressione del pollice, lontanissimi e vicinissimi al tempo stesso. V. Il quinto capitolo, ‘L’estetica dello squalo’, analizza gli effetti sui nuovi film della metamorfosi di un pubblico ormai abituato a consumare sempre più eccezionalmente gli audiovisivi al cinema (in termini quantitativi). Per inseguire i nuovi spettatori i produttori immaginano dall’inizio delle pellicole anfibie, in grado di funzionare bene sui supporti tecnologici più diversi. Nel cinema medio hollywoodiano degli ultimi trent’anni il montaggio si fa sempre più rapido; gli obiettivi a focali lunghe incentivano i bruschi cambi di messa fuoco; i primi piani dei volti degli attori diventano il modo standard di riprendere qualsiasi conversazione; la macchina da presa si muove con una rapidità prima inconcepibile; il digitale consente di ritoccare nei minimi dettagli ogni inquadratura; le sceneggiature rifiutano il lento ma costante sviluppo del racconto tipico del cinema classico per adottare invece una struttura a montagne russe. Con ogni verosimiglianza tutti questi mutamenti nascono dalla necessità di catturare l’attenzione di uno spettatore che – grazie al cambiacanali e allo schermo domestico – può decidere in ogni momento di saltare a un altro programma e che per questo deve essere allettato puntando innanzitutto sulle reazioni istintive e attingendo a meccanismi sempre più elementari e pavloviani (la paura, il desiderio, la fascinazione…). VI. ‘Desdemona deve morire’ offre una riflessione sugli effetti delle nuove tecnologie sul rapporto tradizionale tra soddisfazione estetica ed insegnamento morale. Alcuni anni fa il filosofo americano Stanley Cavell ha proposto di vedere nella passività forzata degli spettatori (che nulla possono fare per coloro che patiscono sul palco) il fulcro dell’esperienza teatrale, ma un ragionamento di simile può valere naturalmente anche per le altri arti della sala, a cominciare dal cinema. La sofferenza provocata dall’impossibilità di salvare Desdemona e Otello dalla rete di Jago servirebbe a rendere gli spettatori consapevoli che, diversamente da quanto succede quando siamo al teatro, nella nostra esperienza quotidiana possiamo e dobbiamo rompere l’asimmetria con la scena: dobbiamo, cioè, lasciarci coinvolgere, uscire dal buio, permettere che gli altri ci guardino e ci scoprano in quanto individui in carne ed ossa (e non ombre), rivelando a loro volta se stessi. Ma, affinché ciò avvenga, è necessario che prima si patisca immobili e in silenzio: senza potersi mettere al riparo grazie al cambiacanali, mentre la televisione arriva appunto a infrangere o almeno a indebolire quel nesso tra costrizione, sofferenza e catarsi che caratterizza l’esperienza scenica da duemilacinquecento anni. Questo non vuol dire che la televisione sia in sé immorale (nessun medium lo è) ma soltanto che ha smesso di puntare all’ammaestramento del suo pubblico, rinnegando il nesso tradizionale tra delectare e docere così importante nella storia del teatro europeo. Senza dolore, senza privazione, senza necessità non possiamo procedere sulla strada del riconoscimento reciproco, ma questo vuol dire che - contrariamente a quello che ripetono pedagogisti ed esperti di mass media - il vero pericolo dello stile di visione post-cinematografico può giungere non tanto dall’eccessivo coinvolgimento del pubblico quanto piuttosto dall’insufficienza della sua partecipazione emotiva. Senza costrizioni siamo sicuramente più liberi ma veniamo anche privati dell’ausilio del “dolore che libera”, in cui tutta la tradizione occidentale, da Aristotele in poi, ha visto un tassello fondamentale di ogni grande esperienza estetica. VII. Il settimo e ultimo capitolo, ‘Catarsi a bassa intensità’, si interroga sull’avvenire del cinema e della cinefilia in un mondo in cui i film sono cambiati perché diversi sono gli spettatori e ancor prima le condizioni di visione offerte dalla tecnologia. Il rischio viene dalla trasformazione dei film in lunghi videoclip anche perché i meno dotati tra i registi contemporanei si accontentano di tenere in pugno il pubblico di rilancio in rilancio. Il grande cinema è dunque morto con la marginalizzazione della sala, come profetizzava pochi anni or sono Susan Sontag? Forse, meno pessimisticamente, la metamorfosi attuale segna soltanto la fine di una particolare idea di cinema storicamente data. E’ ancora presto per esprimere un giudizio definitivo. L’unica certezza, a questo punto, è che gli audiovisivi e gli spettatori di oggi si sono incamminati per una strada completamente inedita e stanno mettendo in discussione tutto quello che credevamo di sapere sull’esperienza del film e sul suo post nel sistema delle arti.

PEDULLA' G (2008). In piena luce. In nuovi spettatori e il sistema delle arti. MILANO : Bompiani.

In piena luce. In nuovi spettatori e il sistema delle arti

PEDULLA', Gabriele
2008

Abstract

Schermi al plasma, lettori portatili, computer, videofonini, palmari: già da qualche anno gli audiovisivi non vengono più pensati per un solo supporto tecnologico, né impongono agli spettatori un unico stile di visione. Se per tutto il XX secolo gli uomini hanno assistito ai film secondo un preciso rituale ereditato dal teatro, silenziosi e composti nel buio della sala, oggi questo legame tra il cinema (come arte) e il cinema (come luogo) appare ogni giorno meno necessario. Le immagini in movimento sono ovunque e sembrano inseguirci nelle nostre esistenze quotidiane, a casa come nei locali pubblici o sui mezzi di trasporto. Come cambiano le pellicole per adattarsi a questa nuova situazione? E come è cambiata, soprattutto, l’esperienza di colui che guarda? Di fronte a uno dei mutamenti decisivi nella storia dell’estetica occidentale, dal Rinascimento a oggi, In piena luce prova a interrogarsi sui film nell’epoca degli individual media e delle “passioni fredde”, per ragionare sulla metamorfosi di uno spettatore sempre più libero ma anche sempre più restio a lasciarsi coinvolgere veramente dai fotogrammi che scorrono davanti ai suoi occhi. Una rivoluzione dello sguardo che sta riplasmando l’intero sistema delle arti e che è destinata a segnare profondamente la creatività contemporanea in tutte le sue manifestazioni. Senza rimpianti ma anche senza facili euforie, In piena luce è in assoluto il primo studio a livello internazionale interamente consacrato alla sala cinematografica come dispositivo estetico. Spaziando dalla filosofia della mente alla teoria del cinema, dalla pratica architettonica alla filosofia morale, da Shakespeare ad Aristotele, questo volume è anche l’occasione per ripensare alcuni dei nodi più scottanti della riflessione contemporanea sul cinema e sulle arti. Possiamo dare credito alle tesi degli psicoanalisti sugli effetti di quel movie theater che Roland Barthes chiamava “dark cube”? O invece ci è più utile il sapere degli architetti? Quanto sono pertinenti le teorie di Walter Benjamin sulla “fruizione nella distrazione”? Esiste una specifica moralità dei diversi medium? La televisione è davvero immorale? Il nostro atteggiamento di spettatori televisivi assomiglia a quello degli avventori delle origini, prima dell’istituzionalizzazione del cinema? Nell’epoca degli individual media c’è ancora spazio per un’arte che non sia solo intrattenimento ma che intenda scuotere profondamente gli spettatori? La morte della tragedia annunciata da George Steiner e da tanti altri studiosi è sul punto di consumarsi per effetto della tecnologia? In piena luce prova a rispondere a interrogativi come questi, nella convinzione che soltanto osservando il presente all’interno di una più lunga sequenza cronologica i cambiamenti degli ultimi anni diventano davvero comprensibili. Una storia cominciata cinquecento anni fa, nell’Italia di Palladio, o forse ancora prima, nell’Atene dei grandi tragici, si sta definitivamente chiudendo. Ma tanto più per questo l’unico modo per non subire passivamente questa trasformazione è prendere al più presto consapevolezza della metamorfosi epocale che sta investendo l’esperienza estetica in quanto tale. I. Il primo capitolo, ‘La caverna e lo specchio’, ripercorre la storia dell’assenza della sala nell’estetica novecentesca e si sofferma sulle strategie attraverso cui i grandi teorici del cinema hanno rimosso o trascurato il ruolo capitale che gli spazi e le architetture ha svolto nell’esperienza degli spettatori lungo tutto il XX secolo. Esattamente come la galleria d’arte contemporanea - il così detto “white cube” - ha promosso un tipo particolare di pittura, “costruendo” un collezionista e un pubblico completamente diverso da quello dei secoli precedenti, allo stesso modo il “cubo opaco” (la sala, secondo una felice definizione di Roland Barthes) ha accompagnato e protetto un tipo particolarissimo di pellicole e ha condizionato in maniera decisiva gli sviluppi dell’arte del film. II. Attraverso un’ampia ricognizione di prima mano della stampa europea e statunitense del tempo, nel secondo capitolo (‘Verso il cubo opaco’) il discorso si concentra sui primi venti anni di vita del cinema, quando le proiezioni avvenivano in luoghi caotici, affollati e spesso troppo illuminati e i film dovevano chiedere ospitalità alle meno rispettabili forme di intrattenimento. La coesistenza tra diverse modalità di fruizione sarebbe durata ancora a lungo dopo l’affermarsi delle prime vere e proprie sale cinematografiche, al punto che solo con l’avvento del sonoro la nuova arte avrebbe adottato definitivamente le regole del teatro (silenzio, immobilità, buio, netta separazione dal mondo esterno, ecc…), tagliando i rapporti con l’universo della fiera e dei cafè chantant e avviandosi a quel riconoscimento sociale che sino a quel momento le era stato negato. III. ‘I figli di Vitruvio’ stabilisce una precisa correlazione tra la trasformazione dei luoghi del cinema, alla metà degli anni Dieci, e l’affermarsi internazionale del film narrativo di due ore al posto delle brevi pellicole che avevano dominato il mercato sino a quel momento. Dalle testimonianze degli architetti che nei primi decenni del secolo hanno inventato la forma della sala cinematografica novecentesca emerge chiaramente come dietro alla loro adozione del modello del “teatro all’italiana” ci fosse la volontà di favorire un tipo particolare di intrattenimento. Il cinema doveva occupare il ruolo una volta detenuto dal grande teatro di prosa e per questo aveva bisogno di uno spazio adatto alle nuove opere. Significativamente, come gli architetti italiani del Rinascimento che hanno concepito i primi edifici teatrali non effimeri si erano preoccupati di disegnare un luogo per gli spettacoli che aiutasse il pubblico ad apprezzare il repertorio drammaturgico greco e romano da poco recuperato, anche i loro eredi novecenteschi hanno visto nelle proprie costruzioni un contributo a un cinema distante dagli cortometraggi dei primissimi anni almeno quanto le tragedie e le commedie classiciste del Cinquecento lo erano dalle farse e dalle sacre rappresentazioni medievali. Attraverso gli spazi il sogno aristotelico di un’arte in grado di sconvolgere e trasformare gli spettatori è passato così alla nuova arte. IV. ‘Gli audiovisivi della libertà’ comincia ad analizzare l’attuale venir meno del nesso novecentesco tra le immagini in movimento e la sala cinematografica, quando l’architettura contribuiva a stabilizzare l’attenzione dei presenti, ma rifiuta l’idea che la situazione attuale possa essere descritta semplicemente come un ritorno alla cine-fiera e al cine-varietà delle origini. Dopo aver discusso (e confutato) la celebre teoria di Walter Benjamin sulla “ricezione nella distrazione” che accompagnerebbe qualsiasi spettacolo cinematografico, il quarto capitolo si sofferma invece sul modo in cui gli individual media contemporanei non solo consentono ma addirittura promuovono in maniera deliberata un coinvolgimento più superficiale e rapsodico. Mentre al teatro e al cinema il pubblico si sottopone volontariamente a un rigoroso regime di necessità, il cambiacanali ci consente di spostarci rimanendo immobili: in altre parole di cercare altrove una fonte di soddisfazione più rapida, cedendo all’istante di noia o alla semplice curiosità di sbirciare quale programma danno sulla rete accanto. E’ sufficiente premere un tasto e la scena davanti ai nostri occhi si trasformerà radicalmente, perché all’immobilità forzata della sala si è sostituita una simulazione di movimento particolarmente inebriante, che ci colloca al centro di un universo di suoni e di colori pronto a mutare a nostro piacimento. Finalmente non c’è nemmeno più bisogno di alzarsi: fermi nella nostra comoda poltrona (ma sempre liberi di dire basta) è il mondo che cambia a nostro piacimento, portandoci da un palcoscenico all’altro con una semplice pressione del pollice, lontanissimi e vicinissimi al tempo stesso. V. Il quinto capitolo, ‘L’estetica dello squalo’, analizza gli effetti sui nuovi film della metamorfosi di un pubblico ormai abituato a consumare sempre più eccezionalmente gli audiovisivi al cinema (in termini quantitativi). Per inseguire i nuovi spettatori i produttori immaginano dall’inizio delle pellicole anfibie, in grado di funzionare bene sui supporti tecnologici più diversi. Nel cinema medio hollywoodiano degli ultimi trent’anni il montaggio si fa sempre più rapido; gli obiettivi a focali lunghe incentivano i bruschi cambi di messa fuoco; i primi piani dei volti degli attori diventano il modo standard di riprendere qualsiasi conversazione; la macchina da presa si muove con una rapidità prima inconcepibile; il digitale consente di ritoccare nei minimi dettagli ogni inquadratura; le sceneggiature rifiutano il lento ma costante sviluppo del racconto tipico del cinema classico per adottare invece una struttura a montagne russe. Con ogni verosimiglianza tutti questi mutamenti nascono dalla necessità di catturare l’attenzione di uno spettatore che – grazie al cambiacanali e allo schermo domestico – può decidere in ogni momento di saltare a un altro programma e che per questo deve essere allettato puntando innanzitutto sulle reazioni istintive e attingendo a meccanismi sempre più elementari e pavloviani (la paura, il desiderio, la fascinazione…). VI. ‘Desdemona deve morire’ offre una riflessione sugli effetti delle nuove tecnologie sul rapporto tradizionale tra soddisfazione estetica ed insegnamento morale. Alcuni anni fa il filosofo americano Stanley Cavell ha proposto di vedere nella passività forzata degli spettatori (che nulla possono fare per coloro che patiscono sul palco) il fulcro dell’esperienza teatrale, ma un ragionamento di simile può valere naturalmente anche per le altri arti della sala, a cominciare dal cinema. La sofferenza provocata dall’impossibilità di salvare Desdemona e Otello dalla rete di Jago servirebbe a rendere gli spettatori consapevoli che, diversamente da quanto succede quando siamo al teatro, nella nostra esperienza quotidiana possiamo e dobbiamo rompere l’asimmetria con la scena: dobbiamo, cioè, lasciarci coinvolgere, uscire dal buio, permettere che gli altri ci guardino e ci scoprano in quanto individui in carne ed ossa (e non ombre), rivelando a loro volta se stessi. Ma, affinché ciò avvenga, è necessario che prima si patisca immobili e in silenzio: senza potersi mettere al riparo grazie al cambiacanali, mentre la televisione arriva appunto a infrangere o almeno a indebolire quel nesso tra costrizione, sofferenza e catarsi che caratterizza l’esperienza scenica da duemilacinquecento anni. Questo non vuol dire che la televisione sia in sé immorale (nessun medium lo è) ma soltanto che ha smesso di puntare all’ammaestramento del suo pubblico, rinnegando il nesso tradizionale tra delectare e docere così importante nella storia del teatro europeo. Senza dolore, senza privazione, senza necessità non possiamo procedere sulla strada del riconoscimento reciproco, ma questo vuol dire che - contrariamente a quello che ripetono pedagogisti ed esperti di mass media - il vero pericolo dello stile di visione post-cinematografico può giungere non tanto dall’eccessivo coinvolgimento del pubblico quanto piuttosto dall’insufficienza della sua partecipazione emotiva. Senza costrizioni siamo sicuramente più liberi ma veniamo anche privati dell’ausilio del “dolore che libera”, in cui tutta la tradizione occidentale, da Aristotele in poi, ha visto un tassello fondamentale di ogni grande esperienza estetica. VII. Il settimo e ultimo capitolo, ‘Catarsi a bassa intensità’, si interroga sull’avvenire del cinema e della cinefilia in un mondo in cui i film sono cambiati perché diversi sono gli spettatori e ancor prima le condizioni di visione offerte dalla tecnologia. Il rischio viene dalla trasformazione dei film in lunghi videoclip anche perché i meno dotati tra i registi contemporanei si accontentano di tenere in pugno il pubblico di rilancio in rilancio. Il grande cinema è dunque morto con la marginalizzazione della sala, come profetizzava pochi anni or sono Susan Sontag? Forse, meno pessimisticamente, la metamorfosi attuale segna soltanto la fine di una particolare idea di cinema storicamente data. E’ ancora presto per esprimere un giudizio definitivo. L’unica certezza, a questo punto, è che gli audiovisivi e gli spettatori di oggi si sono incamminati per una strada completamente inedita e stanno mettendo in discussione tutto quello che credevamo di sapere sull’esperienza del film e sul suo post nel sistema delle arti.
978-88-452-6077-3
Plasma screens, portable players, computers, videophones, handhelds: moving images are no longer designed for just one technical support, nor do they impose on spectators a single viewing style. If for the entire 20th century people attended films following a precise ritual inherited from the live theatre, silent and sedate in the darkness of the auditorium, today this tie between movies and movie theatres seems less crucial every day. Moving images are everywhere and seem to follow us in our daily lives, at home as in public places or transit. How do films change to adapt to this new situation? And, above all, how has the experience of those who watch changed? Facing one of the decisive transformations in the history of Western aesthetics, from the Renaissance until today, In Broad Daylight attempts to investigate films in the age of individual media to reason about the metamorphosis of a spectator increasingly free but also increasingly loath to let himself be truly moved by the images flashing before him. A revolution of the gaze that is remodeling the entire system of the arts and is destined to profoundly shape contemporary creativity in all its manifestations. Without regret but also without facile euphoria, In Broad Daylight is the first study on an international level entirely dedicated to the picture house as aesthetic device. Moving freely from philosophy of mind to film theory, from architectural practice to ethics, from Shakespeare to Aristotle, from Leon Battista Alberti to Orson Welles, Gabriele Pedullà’s book is also the occasion to rethink some of the hottest issues in contemporary reflections on cinema and art. Can we give credence to psychoanalytic theses on the effects of that movie theatre Roland Barthes called the “dark cube”? Or might the wisdom of architects be more useful to us? How pertinent are Walter Benjamin’s theories on “reception in a state of distraction”? Do the different media each have their own moral sense? Is the television really immoral? Does the attitude we hold as television viewers resemble that of movie customers before the institutionalization of the picture house? In the epoch of individual media, is there still space for an art that isn’t just entertainment but seeks to profoundly stir its spectators? Will technology bring about the death of tragedy announced by George Steiner and so many others? In Broad Daylight tries to answer questions like these, with the conviction that only by observing the present within a much longer chronological sequence will we truly comprehend the changes we’ve seen in recent years. A story that began five hundred years ago, in Palladio’s Italy, or perhaps even earlier, in the Athens of the great tragedians, is coming to a definitive close. The only way to avoid passive subjugation to the epochal metamorphosis of aesthetic experience as such is to completely understand it. Synopsis I. The Cave and the Mirror Chapter I, “The Cave and the Mirror,” discusses the absence of the movie theatre in film theory, pointing out how the great film theorists’ strategies have neglected the capital role that architecture and place played in spectator experience throughout the 20th century. Exactly as the contemporary art gallery – the so-called “white cube” – promoted a certain type of painting, “constructing” a new kind of public and collector completely different from those of previous centuries, the “dark cube” (the theatre auditorium, as coined by Roland Barthes) accompanied and protected a very particular type of film and decisively conditioned filmmaking’s development. II. Towards the Dark Cube Through an extensive first-hand investigation of the era’s American and European press, the second chapter (“Towards the Dark Cube”) concentrates on the first twenty years of the cinema’s life, when projections happened in chaotic, overflowing, and often too brightly lit spaces and films had to seek hospitality from the least respectable halls of entertainment. The coexistence of diverse viewing styles would continue long after the first bona fide movie theatres appeared, so long that only with the advent of the talkie would the new art definitively adopt the rules of dramatic theatres (silence, immobility, dark, strict separation from the outside world, etc.), ending its relationship with the world of the fair and the café chantant and acquiring the social recognition it had until then been denied. III. Vitruvius’ Sons The third chapter widens the scale of inquiry. First, it shows how the picture house derives from the theatrical auditorium designed by the humanist-architects of the Italian Renaissance. Studying the works of Vitruvius, in sixteenth century Italy the inventors of modern theatre architecture wanted above all to create a new kind of spectator: a spectator very different from the one that attended the medieval street farces and sacred representations. In this project one can see the desire to strengthen control over the public and introduce it to a new form of art – the modern tragedy – and to lead it to a new secularized, but absolute, form of aestethic experience by applying Aristotle’s precepts about katharsis. Better than any other texts, the works of the Renaissance architects (compared to the works of twentieth century architects, who followed their paths) teach us how the space, the building, can influence the aesthetic response of the audience. Following their intuitions, for centuries thespians had tried to use architecture to discipline the audience and protect it from distractions, but only the movie theatre completely realized their dream. IV. The Age of Freedom “The Age of Freedom” begins to analyze the disappearance of the link between moving images and movie theatres in the 20th century, when architecture helped to stabilize audience attention, but refutes the idea that the current situation can be simply described as a return to the days of the cine-fair or variety cinema. After having discussed (and confuted) Walter Benjamin’s celebrated theory of “reception in a state of distraction,” which would be applied to any cinematographic spectacle, the fourth chapter is dedicated to the ways contemporary individual media do not just allow but actually deliberately promote a more superficial and rhapsodic engagement with films. Though at the theatre or movies the audience voluntarily submits to a regime of necessity, at home the remote control allows us to move while remaining immobile: in other words, to seek quicker satisfaction elsewhere, giving in at any moment to boredom or simple curiosity to peek at the program on the next channel. All it takes is a push of the button and the scene radically changes before our eyes, because the forced immobility of the theatre auditorium is replaced with a particularly intoxicating simulation of movement that places us at the center of a universe of sounds and colors ready to change at our pleasure. Finally there’s no need to even get up: planted in our comfortable chair (but always free to say, “enough”), it’s the world that changes as we wish it to, taking us from one stage to another, near and far at the same time, with a light touch of the thumb. V. The Aesthetics of the Shark The fifth chapter, “The Aesthetics of the Shark,” explores the effect of the metamorphosis of the public (now used to seeing moving images increasingly rarely at the movie theatre) on new releases. To please the new spectators, producers imagine amphibious films capable of working on multiple technological supports. In the average Hollywood movies of the last thirty years, editing has become continuously faster; long throw lenses encourage brusque focus changes; close-ups become the standard mode of shooting any conversation scene; the camera moves with a speed that was once unthinkable; digital technology allows retouching frames down to the minutest detail; screenplays reject the slow but steady development of the classic cinema to instead take viewers on a roller coaster ride. In all probability these changes are born of the need to capture the attention of a spectator who – thanks to the remote control and home screen – can decide to switch from one program to another at whim and for this reason must be drawn in with appeals to instinct and increasingly elementary and Pavlovian mechanisms (fear, desire, enchantment...). VI. Desdemona Must Die Why is the transformation of viewing styles today so impotant? And how is the aesthetic experience changing under the influence of individual media? To answer these questions “Desdemona Must Die” moves from a seminal essay by American philosopher Stanley Cavell, perhaps the only scholar who has constructed a whole theory of theatre upon the spectator’s imprisonment during a show. According to Cavell, the special experience we have at the theatre is closely tied to the absence of freedom. We suffer with the characters because we cannot do anything to interfere in the dramatic action; it is our physical confinement that enables such emotional transfer, because we feel – in our very bodies – the force of tragic necessity. The theatre’s morality is also a result of such constriction because learning that we cannot help the men and women on stage (we cannot save Desdemona from Othello) also teaches us that this impossibility is exactly what separates going to the theatre from living our real lives – where we can (and should) take action to change the world around us. This was the nature of the drama’s moral teaching in the Western tradition, but the rise of individual media threatens this nexus between aesthetic pleasure, tragic pain, and ethics. Are we witnessing the death of tragedy? VII. Low-Impact Catharsis The seventh and final chapter, “Low-Impact Catharsis,” reflects on the future of the cinema and cinephelia in a world where films have changed because spectators and, even more importantly, the viewing conditions offered by technology have as well. The danger is that films are transformed into long music videos, also because less talented contemporary directors are satisfied simply to keep the audience in their grip. Is the great cinema dead with the marginalization of the movie house, as Susan Sontag prophesied a few years ago? Perhaps, to be less pessimistic, the current metamorphosis only indicates the end of a particular idea of cinema. It’s still too soon to tell. The only certainty, at this point, is that today’s moving images and spectators have set off down an unbeaten path and are putting up for discussion all that we thought we knew about the film experience and its place in the system of the arts.
PEDULLA' G (2008). In piena luce. In nuovi spettatori e il sistema delle arti. MILANO : Bompiani.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11590/188493
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact