The teaching of descriptive geometry in Spain spread at the pace of the development of technical education. Despite the awareness of the need of innovation, and of the foundation of local schools, until the end of the 19th century the State did not organize a network of schools for workers and artisans-technicians. Instead, the efforts were concentrated on the schools for engineers, with two kinds of difficulties: the lack of students, so that the only stable schools were at Madrid (while there was a great demand for elementary and middle technical education); and the relatively unbalanced relationship with the Faculty of Sciences, and specially the mathematical department, which was considered as a preparatory school for the school of architecture and the several engineering schools (to the disappointment of engineers). The contribution by Culmann to further development of the graphical instruments of the engineer and the new didactical approach to descriptive geometry by Bellavitis, Fiedler, and Cremona, was considered with interest by scholars in Barcelona and Madrid, although this led to an attention being paid almost exclusively to synthetic geometry. As a consequence, descriptive geometry had a key role in the curriculum of the master in mathematics, but as we shall see this increasingly became a hindrance to the development of the mathematical level of information in the country around 1900, and to the actual diffusion of the ethos of research.

MILLAN GASCA, A.M. (2019). Descriptive geometry in Spain as an example of the emergence of the late modern European outlook on the relationship between pure science and technology. In M.M. Evelyne Barbin (a cura di), Descriptive geometry, The spread of a polytechnic art. The legacy of Gaspard Monge (pp. 81-96). Cham : Springer Nature.

Descriptive geometry in Spain as an example of the emergence of the late modern European outlook on the relationship between pure science and technology

MILLAN GASCA, Ana Maria
2019

Abstract

The teaching of descriptive geometry in Spain spread at the pace of the development of technical education. Despite the awareness of the need of innovation, and of the foundation of local schools, until the end of the 19th century the State did not organize a network of schools for workers and artisans-technicians. Instead, the efforts were concentrated on the schools for engineers, with two kinds of difficulties: the lack of students, so that the only stable schools were at Madrid (while there was a great demand for elementary and middle technical education); and the relatively unbalanced relationship with the Faculty of Sciences, and specially the mathematical department, which was considered as a preparatory school for the school of architecture and the several engineering schools (to the disappointment of engineers). The contribution by Culmann to further development of the graphical instruments of the engineer and the new didactical approach to descriptive geometry by Bellavitis, Fiedler, and Cremona, was considered with interest by scholars in Barcelona and Madrid, although this led to an attention being paid almost exclusively to synthetic geometry. As a consequence, descriptive geometry had a key role in the curriculum of the master in mathematics, but as we shall see this increasingly became a hindrance to the development of the mathematical level of information in the country around 1900, and to the actual diffusion of the ethos of research.
9783030148072
MILLAN GASCA, A.M. (2019). Descriptive geometry in Spain as an example of the emergence of the late modern European outlook on the relationship between pure science and technology. In M.M. Evelyne Barbin (a cura di), Descriptive geometry, The spread of a polytechnic art. The legacy of Gaspard Monge (pp. 81-96). Cham : Springer Nature.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/316412
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