Research from many different disciplines – including environmental psychology, urban forestry, human ecology, human geography, landscape architecture, and environmental epidemiology – has consistently highlighted the tendency of human beings to prefer scenes and settings where there is a substantial presence of natural elements, such as plants, trees and water (e.g., Purcell et al. 2001; Van den Berg et al. 2007). According to a shared view in the scientific community, such a preference can be explained through an evolutionary mechanism, which has selected the human capacity of appreciating those elements in their life settings that make an environment more suitable for survival, providing food, shelter from predators, and better survival conditions, in general. This vision has come to be known as the “bio- philia hypothesis” (e.g., Kellert and Wilson 1993).

Carrus, G., Dadvand, P., Sanesi, G. (2017). The Role and Value of Urban Forests and Green Infrastructure in Promoting Human Health and Wellbeing. In C.C. D. Pearlmutter (a cura di), The Urban Forest: Cultivating Green Infrastructure for People and the Environment (pp. 217-230) [10.1007/978-3-319-50280-9_17].

The Role and Value of Urban Forests and Green Infrastructure in Promoting Human Health and Wellbeing

CARRUS, GIUSEPPE;
2017-01-01

Abstract

Research from many different disciplines – including environmental psychology, urban forestry, human ecology, human geography, landscape architecture, and environmental epidemiology – has consistently highlighted the tendency of human beings to prefer scenes and settings where there is a substantial presence of natural elements, such as plants, trees and water (e.g., Purcell et al. 2001; Van den Berg et al. 2007). According to a shared view in the scientific community, such a preference can be explained through an evolutionary mechanism, which has selected the human capacity of appreciating those elements in their life settings that make an environment more suitable for survival, providing food, shelter from predators, and better survival conditions, in general. This vision has come to be known as the “bio- philia hypothesis” (e.g., Kellert and Wilson 1993).
Carrus, G., Dadvand, P., Sanesi, G. (2017). The Role and Value of Urban Forests and Green Infrastructure in Promoting Human Health and Wellbeing. In C.C. D. Pearlmutter (a cura di), The Urban Forest: Cultivating Green Infrastructure for People and the Environment (pp. 217-230) [10.1007/978-3-319-50280-9_17].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/317061
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