The volume presents a collection of essays devoted to circulation and transmission of Roman legal knowledge in Late Antiquity, focusing on the description, edition and commentary of legal fragments, on papyrus and parchment, from III to V c. AD; this period, between the classical age of Roman legal jurisprudence and the great enterprise of the Digest of Justinian, is usually considered of decadence in the traditional legal scholarship. The papyrus and parchment fragments, mostly found in archaeological excavation in the Eastern Part of the Roman Empire or kept in Western Libraries for centuries, contain texts different in topics and lengths: some are copies of works of classical legal literature (e.g., Ulpian), some others are Greek or Latin-Greek legal commentaries; a few of them bear text which are not known from other sources, therefore is not possible to guess if they are original works or commentaries in somebody else work; there are excerpts from different authors and works, interlinear and marginal glosses of considerable length. The same variety can be seen in their book formats (from fine parchments books to re-used papyrus leaves, from pocket books to wide margin pages, suitable to host long annotations) and scripts (from Latin legal uncial to cursive scripts; a considerable bilingual and digraphical evidence is here discussed, too). All this diversity is a significant witness of the lively word of Roman legal scholarship in Late Antiquity. Scholars from different Italian and foreign universities (Bari, Naples, Parma, Pavia, Rome, Siena, Zurich) present in this book the results of their investigations in the frame of the PRIN 2009 project ‘Legal literature in Late Antiquity (III-V c. AD). History and Geography’. Ulrico Agnati (Parma) e Serena Ammirati (Roma Tre-Pavia) present a re-edition and commentary of P.Oxy. XVII 2089, whose text is about marital legacies. Author and title of the work are unknown. Sergio Alessandrì offer a new exegesis of PSI XIV 1449, from book 32 of Ulpian, Ad edictum; Andrea Lovato discusses the contents of P.Fay. 10 and P.Berol. inv. 11533, a papyrus fragment about imperial dispositions on the legacy of the soldiers; and of Cod. Vind. 1b, which bears Ulpian Institutions; the essay of Federico Battaglia (Zurich) focuses on the structure and the definitions of PSI XIII 1348; to Valerio Marotta (Pavia) we owe a new commentary on P.Berol. inv. 6757, known as Fragmentum de iudiciis; Stefania Pietrini (Siena)’s paper is about the meaning of the marginal glosses preserved through P.Ant. III 152, on dowry and the related legal actions; Jolanda Ruggiero (Roma, Sapienza) presents the wellknown Fragments with the Sententiae of Paul, Leiden, BPL 2589. Fragments different in content are nonetheless very important to reconstruct the legal thinking of Late Antiquity: Maria Chiara Scappaticcio (Naples) edits and comments the legal glosses in P.Ryl. III 477, a papyrus collection of Cicero’s speeches; Serena Ammirati offers a survey of bilingual Greek-Latin glossaries and their graphic and textual interaction with legal fragments; Dario Mantovani (Pavia)’s reflections about the origin of Digest offer a new insight on the continuity in the transmission of Roman classical legal scholarship, which helps to frame all the fragments discussed in the book.

Ammirati, S., Mantovani, D., Alessandrì, S., Agnati, U., Battaglia, F., Ruggiero, I., et al. (a cura di). (2018). Giurisprudenza romana nei papiri. Tracce per una ricerca. Pavia : Pavia University Press.

Giurisprudenza romana nei papiri. Tracce per una ricerca

Ammirati Serena;
2018-01-01

Abstract

The volume presents a collection of essays devoted to circulation and transmission of Roman legal knowledge in Late Antiquity, focusing on the description, edition and commentary of legal fragments, on papyrus and parchment, from III to V c. AD; this period, between the classical age of Roman legal jurisprudence and the great enterprise of the Digest of Justinian, is usually considered of decadence in the traditional legal scholarship. The papyrus and parchment fragments, mostly found in archaeological excavation in the Eastern Part of the Roman Empire or kept in Western Libraries for centuries, contain texts different in topics and lengths: some are copies of works of classical legal literature (e.g., Ulpian), some others are Greek or Latin-Greek legal commentaries; a few of them bear text which are not known from other sources, therefore is not possible to guess if they are original works or commentaries in somebody else work; there are excerpts from different authors and works, interlinear and marginal glosses of considerable length. The same variety can be seen in their book formats (from fine parchments books to re-used papyrus leaves, from pocket books to wide margin pages, suitable to host long annotations) and scripts (from Latin legal uncial to cursive scripts; a considerable bilingual and digraphical evidence is here discussed, too). All this diversity is a significant witness of the lively word of Roman legal scholarship in Late Antiquity. Scholars from different Italian and foreign universities (Bari, Naples, Parma, Pavia, Rome, Siena, Zurich) present in this book the results of their investigations in the frame of the PRIN 2009 project ‘Legal literature in Late Antiquity (III-V c. AD). History and Geography’. Ulrico Agnati (Parma) e Serena Ammirati (Roma Tre-Pavia) present a re-edition and commentary of P.Oxy. XVII 2089, whose text is about marital legacies. Author and title of the work are unknown. Sergio Alessandrì offer a new exegesis of PSI XIV 1449, from book 32 of Ulpian, Ad edictum; Andrea Lovato discusses the contents of P.Fay. 10 and P.Berol. inv. 11533, a papyrus fragment about imperial dispositions on the legacy of the soldiers; and of Cod. Vind. 1b, which bears Ulpian Institutions; the essay of Federico Battaglia (Zurich) focuses on the structure and the definitions of PSI XIII 1348; to Valerio Marotta (Pavia) we owe a new commentary on P.Berol. inv. 6757, known as Fragmentum de iudiciis; Stefania Pietrini (Siena)’s paper is about the meaning of the marginal glosses preserved through P.Ant. III 152, on dowry and the related legal actions; Jolanda Ruggiero (Roma, Sapienza) presents the wellknown Fragments with the Sententiae of Paul, Leiden, BPL 2589. Fragments different in content are nonetheless very important to reconstruct the legal thinking of Late Antiquity: Maria Chiara Scappaticcio (Naples) edits and comments the legal glosses in P.Ryl. III 477, a papyrus collection of Cicero’s speeches; Serena Ammirati offers a survey of bilingual Greek-Latin glossaries and their graphic and textual interaction with legal fragments; Dario Mantovani (Pavia)’s reflections about the origin of Digest offer a new insight on the continuity in the transmission of Roman classical legal scholarship, which helps to frame all the fragments discussed in the book.
978-88-6952-084-6
Ammirati, S., Mantovani, D., Alessandrì, S., Agnati, U., Battaglia, F., Ruggiero, I., et al. (a cura di). (2018). Giurisprudenza romana nei papiri. Tracce per una ricerca. Pavia : Pavia University Press.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/340345
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