The purpose of this essay is to investigate the reasons, not only cultural, for the attraction that between the 18th and 20th centuries drove many great philosophers and intellectuals - from Winckelmann to Goethe, from Vischer to Freud to Henrich - to travel south in particular to Italy and Greece, to visit the legendary places of the origin and the classic. On the other hand, another tendency will also be considered, that of the " non-journey " that interested both Winckelmann - who never reached Greece - and Hegel, who approached the South above all through erudite approximations. The aim is thus to take stock of the need for travelling of intellectuals from the northern countries to the Mediterranean Sea at various stages: from the times when travelling was a risky adventure for the few to the turning point in the 1840s when, following the construction of the main railway lines in Europe, the South became closer and was looked upon with disenchantment, and then on to the trivialisation of classic places and the virtual tourism of our times, which perhaps - unintentionally - increased the desire for the South and helped to make people dream of lost lands.

Iannelli, F. (In corso di stampa). From the Grand Tour to the Virtual Tour. Dreaming of the classical between past and present. In Marie-Elise Zovko and John Dillon (a cura di), Tourism and Culture in Philosophical Perspective. Berlin : Springer.

From the Grand Tour to the Virtual Tour. Dreaming of the classical between past and present

IANNELLI F
In corso di stampa

Abstract

The purpose of this essay is to investigate the reasons, not only cultural, for the attraction that between the 18th and 20th centuries drove many great philosophers and intellectuals - from Winckelmann to Goethe, from Vischer to Freud to Henrich - to travel south in particular to Italy and Greece, to visit the legendary places of the origin and the classic. On the other hand, another tendency will also be considered, that of the " non-journey " that interested both Winckelmann - who never reached Greece - and Hegel, who approached the South above all through erudite approximations. The aim is thus to take stock of the need for travelling of intellectuals from the northern countries to the Mediterranean Sea at various stages: from the times when travelling was a risky adventure for the few to the turning point in the 1840s when, following the construction of the main railway lines in Europe, the South became closer and was looked upon with disenchantment, and then on to the trivialisation of classic places and the virtual tourism of our times, which perhaps - unintentionally - increased the desire for the South and helped to make people dream of lost lands.
Iannelli, F. (In corso di stampa). From the Grand Tour to the Virtual Tour. Dreaming of the classical between past and present. In Marie-Elise Zovko and John Dillon (a cura di), Tourism and Culture in Philosophical Perspective. Berlin : Springer.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/396446
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