Gamma-ray observations of the pulsar of the Crab nebula, PSR0531+21, have been performed in the low energy range (0.15-4.0 MeV) with FIGARO II, a large area balloon borne NaI(Tl) detector, during two flights performed on 1986 July 11 and 1990 July 9. A Kernel estimator built from the phases of the individual gamma-ray arrival times has allowed an accurate derivation of the radio-gamma time delay from those short duration gamma-ray observations. The gamma-ray pulse is found ahead of the radio pulse by 600 +/- 145 mu s and 375 +/- 148 mu s for the 1986 and 1990 observations respectively. Both radio-gamma delays could be attributed to variability of the interstellar dispersion since dispersion measures are available from radio measurements respectively two months before the 1986 flight and six days after the 1990 flight. An alternative explanation, particularly from the 1990 observation, could be that maximum gamma-ray and radio emissions originate from spatially different regions of the magnetosphere, distant by about 100 km.

MASNOU JL, AGRINIER B, BAROUCH E, COMTE R, COSTA E, CHRISTY JC, et al. (1994). THE RADIO-GAMMA TIME-DELAY OF THE CRAB PULSAR. ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS, 290(2), 503-509.

THE RADIO-GAMMA TIME-DELAY OF THE CRAB PULSAR

MATT, Giorgio;
1994

Abstract

Gamma-ray observations of the pulsar of the Crab nebula, PSR0531+21, have been performed in the low energy range (0.15-4.0 MeV) with FIGARO II, a large area balloon borne NaI(Tl) detector, during two flights performed on 1986 July 11 and 1990 July 9. A Kernel estimator built from the phases of the individual gamma-ray arrival times has allowed an accurate derivation of the radio-gamma time delay from those short duration gamma-ray observations. The gamma-ray pulse is found ahead of the radio pulse by 600 +/- 145 mu s and 375 +/- 148 mu s for the 1986 and 1990 observations respectively. Both radio-gamma delays could be attributed to variability of the interstellar dispersion since dispersion measures are available from radio measurements respectively two months before the 1986 flight and six days after the 1990 flight. An alternative explanation, particularly from the 1990 observation, could be that maximum gamma-ray and radio emissions originate from spatially different regions of the magnetosphere, distant by about 100 km.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11590/114129
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