The possible nuclear compartmentalization of glutathione transferase isoenzymes has been the subject of contradictory reports. The discovery that the dinitrosyl-diglutathionyl-iron complex binds tightly to Alpha class GSTs in rat hepatocytes and that a significant part of the bound complex is also associated to the nuclear fraction (Pedersen et al., the accompanying paper), prompted us to reconsider the nuclear localization of GSTs in these cells. Surprisingly, we found that a considerable amount of GSTs corresponding to 10% of the cytosolic pool, is electrostatically associated to the outer nuclear membrane, and a similar quantity is compartmentalized inside the nucleus. Mainly Alpha class GSTs, in particular GSTA1-1, GSTA2-2 and GSTA3-3 are involved in this double modality of interaction. Confocal microscopy, immunofluorescence experiments and molecular modeling have been used to detail the electrostatic association in hepatocytes and liposomes. A quantitative analysis of the membrane bound Alpha GSTs suggests the existence of a multilayer assembly of these enzymes at the outer nuclear envelope that could represent an amazing novelty in cell physiology. The interception of potentially noxious compounds to prevent DNA damage could be the possible physiological role of the perinuclear and intranuclear localization of Alpha GSTs.

STELLA L, PALLOTTINI V, MORENO S, LEONI S, DE MARIA F, TURELLA P, et al. (2007). Electrostatic association of glutathione transferase to the nuclear membrane: Evidence of a defense barrier at the nuclear envelope. THE JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, 282, 6364-6371 [10.1074/jbc.M609906200].

Electrostatic association of glutathione transferase to the nuclear membrane: Evidence of a defense barrier at the nuclear envelope

PALLOTTINI, Valentina;
2007

Abstract

The possible nuclear compartmentalization of glutathione transferase isoenzymes has been the subject of contradictory reports. The discovery that the dinitrosyl-diglutathionyl-iron complex binds tightly to Alpha class GSTs in rat hepatocytes and that a significant part of the bound complex is also associated to the nuclear fraction (Pedersen et al., the accompanying paper), prompted us to reconsider the nuclear localization of GSTs in these cells. Surprisingly, we found that a considerable amount of GSTs corresponding to 10% of the cytosolic pool, is electrostatically associated to the outer nuclear membrane, and a similar quantity is compartmentalized inside the nucleus. Mainly Alpha class GSTs, in particular GSTA1-1, GSTA2-2 and GSTA3-3 are involved in this double modality of interaction. Confocal microscopy, immunofluorescence experiments and molecular modeling have been used to detail the electrostatic association in hepatocytes and liposomes. A quantitative analysis of the membrane bound Alpha GSTs suggests the existence of a multilayer assembly of these enzymes at the outer nuclear envelope that could represent an amazing novelty in cell physiology. The interception of potentially noxious compounds to prevent DNA damage could be the possible physiological role of the perinuclear and intranuclear localization of Alpha GSTs.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11590/123130
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