The authors introduce and shortly discuss the intriguing issue of biogeographical disjunctions, with special emphasis on the Mediterranean-southern African disjunctions, analyzed considering both dispersal and vicariance models. Combined data sets based on both morphological and molecular cues from a relatively large series of different animal and vegetal taxa (some of them extensively discussed in the present volume) indicate true and significant phylogenetic relationships between Mediterranean and southern African biota. Where molecular data are available, the estimated times of divergence frequently supports evidence of an “Arid Corridor”, or of a “Central or Eastern High Africa Corridor”, which connected a number of times in the last 20-25 MYs the European-Mediterranean and eastern/southern African areas, and facilitated species migration northwards and southwards. These corridors allowed the dispersal southwards of several taxa of European-Mediterranean origin, frequently reaching at least the main mountain systems and the coasts of Eastern and SE Africa. On the other hand, several taxa of eastern and southern African origin migrated northwards, colonizing the Mediterranean and southern Palaearctic areas. Finally, secondary radiations at specific level frequently occurred in the last MYs both in Mediterranean and African areas, involving taxa of African and Mediterranean origins, respectively.

Bologna M, Audisio P, Biondi M, & Casale A (2008). The biogeographic patterns of disjunct distribution with special emphasis on the Mediterranean and southern African model. BIOGEOGRAPHIA, 29, 7-17.

The biogeographic patterns of disjunct distribution with special emphasis on the Mediterranean and southern African model

BOLOGNA, Marco Alberto;
2008

Abstract

The authors introduce and shortly discuss the intriguing issue of biogeographical disjunctions, with special emphasis on the Mediterranean-southern African disjunctions, analyzed considering both dispersal and vicariance models. Combined data sets based on both morphological and molecular cues from a relatively large series of different animal and vegetal taxa (some of them extensively discussed in the present volume) indicate true and significant phylogenetic relationships between Mediterranean and southern African biota. Where molecular data are available, the estimated times of divergence frequently supports evidence of an “Arid Corridor”, or of a “Central or Eastern High Africa Corridor”, which connected a number of times in the last 20-25 MYs the European-Mediterranean and eastern/southern African areas, and facilitated species migration northwards and southwards. These corridors allowed the dispersal southwards of several taxa of European-Mediterranean origin, frequently reaching at least the main mountain systems and the coasts of Eastern and SE Africa. On the other hand, several taxa of eastern and southern African origin migrated northwards, colonizing the Mediterranean and southern Palaearctic areas. Finally, secondary radiations at specific level frequently occurred in the last MYs both in Mediterranean and African areas, involving taxa of African and Mediterranean origins, respectively.
Bologna M, Audisio P, Biondi M, & Casale A (2008). The biogeographic patterns of disjunct distribution with special emphasis on the Mediterranean and southern African model. BIOGEOGRAPHIA, 29, 7-17.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11590/137845
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