The 2002-2003 Mount Etna eruption and the associated displacement of the volcano’s unstable eastern flanks provided a unique possibility to understand the relationships between volcanism and flank movement. Part of the E-flank of the volcano edifice destabilized before the main eruptive phase, prompting an earthquake swarm, fault reactivation and surface ruptures. The subsequent eruption occurred from fissures at the N- and the S-rift zones and was followed by further destabilization of the volcano Eflank, causing additional flank destabilization and increased flank movement. Further seismic swarms and surface ruptures occurred on the east and also on the southeast flank, and the final area of flank movement implicated 700 km2. 2 In this paper we investigate how episodes of magmatism and flank movement at Mount Etna are interacting, with an attempt to understand the sequence of the 2002-2003 events. In 3-D numerical models we simulate the main volcano-tectonic events and calculate the resulting change in the static stress field. The models suggest that these events are the consequence of interrelated processes consisting of: (1) the pre-eruptive intrusion of magma and inflation of the volcano, (2) inducing the incipient slip on the volcano east flank, (3) facilitating the eruption and (4) leading to the slip of a much larger part of the volcano east and southeast flank. Understanding the precise modalities of these processes may help to foresee coming active phases at Mount Etna, which is crucial in minimizing volcanic and seismic hazards on the highly populated eastern volcano flank.

WALTER T.R, ACOCELLA V, NERI M, & AMELUNG F (2005). Feedback processes between magmatism and E-flank movement at Mt. Etna (Italy) during the 2002-2003 eruption. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, 110 [10.1029/2005JB003688].

Feedback processes between magmatism and E-flank movement at Mt. Etna (Italy) during the 2002-2003 eruption

ACOCELLA, Valerio;
2005

Abstract

The 2002-2003 Mount Etna eruption and the associated displacement of the volcano’s unstable eastern flanks provided a unique possibility to understand the relationships between volcanism and flank movement. Part of the E-flank of the volcano edifice destabilized before the main eruptive phase, prompting an earthquake swarm, fault reactivation and surface ruptures. The subsequent eruption occurred from fissures at the N- and the S-rift zones and was followed by further destabilization of the volcano Eflank, causing additional flank destabilization and increased flank movement. Further seismic swarms and surface ruptures occurred on the east and also on the southeast flank, and the final area of flank movement implicated 700 km2. 2 In this paper we investigate how episodes of magmatism and flank movement at Mount Etna are interacting, with an attempt to understand the sequence of the 2002-2003 events. In 3-D numerical models we simulate the main volcano-tectonic events and calculate the resulting change in the static stress field. The models suggest that these events are the consequence of interrelated processes consisting of: (1) the pre-eruptive intrusion of magma and inflation of the volcano, (2) inducing the incipient slip on the volcano east flank, (3) facilitating the eruption and (4) leading to the slip of a much larger part of the volcano east and southeast flank. Understanding the precise modalities of these processes may help to foresee coming active phases at Mount Etna, which is crucial in minimizing volcanic and seismic hazards on the highly populated eastern volcano flank.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11590/139764
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