During the 1920s some American women economists developed theoretical, empirical and historical analyses that constituted a theory of consumption. The original formulations of this approach were based on the view, theorised by T. Veblen, that consuming certain goods makes it possible to identify with specific social groups. These analyses were explicitly alternative to the theories of consumption based on marginal utility. In the 1930s, however, the analyses of a second generation of women economists became exclusively empirical and the theoretical features that made the approach original and an alternative to marginalism were lost.

Trezzini, A. (2016). Early contributions to the economics of consumption as a social phenomenon. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT, 23(2), 272-296 [10.1080/09672567.2014.881899].

Early contributions to the economics of consumption as a social phenomenon

TREZZINI, ATTILIO
2016-01-01

Abstract

During the 1920s some American women economists developed theoretical, empirical and historical analyses that constituted a theory of consumption. The original formulations of this approach were based on the view, theorised by T. Veblen, that consuming certain goods makes it possible to identify with specific social groups. These analyses were explicitly alternative to the theories of consumption based on marginal utility. In the 1930s, however, the analyses of a second generation of women economists became exclusively empirical and the theoretical features that made the approach original and an alternative to marginalism were lost.
Trezzini, A. (2016). Early contributions to the economics of consumption as a social phenomenon. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT, 23(2), 272-296 [10.1080/09672567.2014.881899].
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/142594
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 9
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 7
social impact