Much research effort has been directed toward understanding how estrogen [17-estradiol (E2)] regulates cell proliferation and motility through the rapid, direct activation of cytoplasmic signaling cascades (i.e. nongenomic signaling). Cell migration is critical to cancer cell invasion and metastasis and involves dynamic filamentous actin cytoskeletal remodeling and disassembly of focal adhesion sites. Although estrogen is recognized to induce cell migration in some model systems, very little information is available regarding the underlying pathways and potential influence of selective estrogen receptor modulators such as 4-hydroxytamoxifen on these processes. Using the human endometrial cancer cell lines Hec 1A and Hec 1B as model systems, we have investigated the effects of E2 and Tam on endometrial nongenomic signaling, cytoskeletal remodeling, and cell motility. Results indicate that both E2 and Tam triggered rapid activation of ERK1/2, c-Src, and focal adhesion kinase signaling pathways and filamentous actin cytoskeletal changes. These changes included dissolution of stress fibers, dynamic actin accumulation at the cell periphery, and formation of lamellipodia, filopodia, and membrane spikes. Longer treatments with either agent induced cell migration in wound healing and Boyden chamber assays. Agent-induced cytoskeletal remodeling and cell migration were blocked by a Src inhibitor. These findings define cytoskeletal remodeling and cell migration as processes regulated by E2 and 4-hydroxytamoxifen nongenomic signaling in endometrial cancer. This new information may serve as the foundation for the development of new clinical therapeutic strategies. (Endocrinology 147: 1203–1212, 2006)

Acconcia, F., Barnes, C.j., Kumar, R. (2006). Estrogen and tamoxifen induce cytoskeletal remodeling and migration in endometrial cancer cells. ENDOCRINOLOGY, 147, 1203-1212 [10.1210/en.2005-1293].

Estrogen and tamoxifen induce cytoskeletal remodeling and migration in endometrial cancer cells

ACCONCIA, FILIPPO;
2006-01-01

Abstract

Much research effort has been directed toward understanding how estrogen [17-estradiol (E2)] regulates cell proliferation and motility through the rapid, direct activation of cytoplasmic signaling cascades (i.e. nongenomic signaling). Cell migration is critical to cancer cell invasion and metastasis and involves dynamic filamentous actin cytoskeletal remodeling and disassembly of focal adhesion sites. Although estrogen is recognized to induce cell migration in some model systems, very little information is available regarding the underlying pathways and potential influence of selective estrogen receptor modulators such as 4-hydroxytamoxifen on these processes. Using the human endometrial cancer cell lines Hec 1A and Hec 1B as model systems, we have investigated the effects of E2 and Tam on endometrial nongenomic signaling, cytoskeletal remodeling, and cell motility. Results indicate that both E2 and Tam triggered rapid activation of ERK1/2, c-Src, and focal adhesion kinase signaling pathways and filamentous actin cytoskeletal changes. These changes included dissolution of stress fibers, dynamic actin accumulation at the cell periphery, and formation of lamellipodia, filopodia, and membrane spikes. Longer treatments with either agent induced cell migration in wound healing and Boyden chamber assays. Agent-induced cytoskeletal remodeling and cell migration were blocked by a Src inhibitor. These findings define cytoskeletal remodeling and cell migration as processes regulated by E2 and 4-hydroxytamoxifen nongenomic signaling in endometrial cancer. This new information may serve as the foundation for the development of new clinical therapeutic strategies. (Endocrinology 147: 1203–1212, 2006)
2006
Acconcia, F., Barnes, C.j., Kumar, R. (2006). Estrogen and tamoxifen induce cytoskeletal remodeling and migration in endometrial cancer cells. ENDOCRINOLOGY, 147, 1203-1212 [10.1210/en.2005-1293].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/143313
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