The seasonal activity of the common dormouse Muscardinus avellanarius was studied in three different habitat types of central Italy: a deciduous beech wood dominated by Fagus sylvatica (Cimini Mountains), and a deciduous oak woodland with Quercus cerris and Q. pubescens and an evergreen wood dominated by holm oak Q. ilex, both along the central Tyrrhenic coast. In each site, 50 nest-boxes were fixed to trees and were monitored monthly for 2 years (May 1998–April 2000). In the beech wood site, the species showed an annual biological cycle similar to that described for populations of central and northern Europe: dormancy in winter, from the first 10 days of November to the end of December; end of hibernation in the first half of April; reproduction between May and July. On the contrary, in the two coastal sites, nest-boxes were occupied from October to June, and the breeding period was in autumn, showing that a winter dormancy phase is absent, probably owing to the mild winter. On the other hand, no dormice or new nests were observed in nest-boxes in summer suggesting that a dormancy phase occurred in summer, probably owing to dry climatic conditions. Two patterns of biological cycle therefore emerged from the results: a temperate pattern in beech forest with winter dormancy and spring reproduction, and a Mediterranean pattern in coastal habitats with autumnal reproduction, winter activity and summer dormancy. Key words: Muscardinus avellanarius, nest-boxes, activity patterns, hibernation, Mediterranean ecosystem

Panchetti, F., Amori, G., Carpaneto, G., Sorace, A. (2004). Activity patterns of the common dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius, in different Mediterranean ecosystems. JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 262, 289-294 [10.1017/S0952836903004618].

Activity patterns of the common dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius, in different Mediterranean ecosystems

CARPANETO, Giuseppe;
2004-01-01

Abstract

The seasonal activity of the common dormouse Muscardinus avellanarius was studied in three different habitat types of central Italy: a deciduous beech wood dominated by Fagus sylvatica (Cimini Mountains), and a deciduous oak woodland with Quercus cerris and Q. pubescens and an evergreen wood dominated by holm oak Q. ilex, both along the central Tyrrhenic coast. In each site, 50 nest-boxes were fixed to trees and were monitored monthly for 2 years (May 1998–April 2000). In the beech wood site, the species showed an annual biological cycle similar to that described for populations of central and northern Europe: dormancy in winter, from the first 10 days of November to the end of December; end of hibernation in the first half of April; reproduction between May and July. On the contrary, in the two coastal sites, nest-boxes were occupied from October to June, and the breeding period was in autumn, showing that a winter dormancy phase is absent, probably owing to the mild winter. On the other hand, no dormice or new nests were observed in nest-boxes in summer suggesting that a dormancy phase occurred in summer, probably owing to dry climatic conditions. Two patterns of biological cycle therefore emerged from the results: a temperate pattern in beech forest with winter dormancy and spring reproduction, and a Mediterranean pattern in coastal habitats with autumnal reproduction, winter activity and summer dormancy. Key words: Muscardinus avellanarius, nest-boxes, activity patterns, hibernation, Mediterranean ecosystem
Panchetti, F., Amori, G., Carpaneto, G., Sorace, A. (2004). Activity patterns of the common dormouse, Muscardinus avellanarius, in different Mediterranean ecosystems. JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGY, 262, 289-294 [10.1017/S0952836903004618].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/150240
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