A semipermanent Global Positioning System (GPS) network of 30 vertices known as the Victoria Land Network for Deformation Control (VLNDEF) was set up in the Austral summer of 1998 in northern Victoria Land (NVL), including Terra Nova Bay (TNB), Antarctica. The locations were selected according to the known Cenozoic fault framework, which is characterized by a system of NW‐SE regional faults with right‐lateral, strike‐slip kinematics. The TNB1 permanent GPS station is within the VLNDEF, and following its installation on a bedrock monument in October 1998, it has been recording almost continuously. The GPS network has been surveyed routinely every two summers, using high‐quality, dual‐frequency GPS receivers. In this study we present the results of a distributed session approach applied to the processing of the GPS data of the VLNDEF. An improved reference frame definition was implemented, including a new Euler pole, to compute the Antarctic intraplate residual velocities. The projection of the residual velocities on the main faults in NVL show present‐day activities for some faults, including the Tucker, Leap Year, Lanterman, Aviator, and David faults, with right‐lateral strike‐slip kinematics and local extensional and compressional components. This active fault pattern divides NVL into eight rigid blocks, each characterized by its relative movements and rigid rotations. These show velocities of up to several millimeters per year, which are comparable to those predicted by plate tectonic theory at active plate margins.

Dubbini, M., Cianfarra, P., Casula, G., Capra, A., Salvini, F. (2010). Active tectonics in northern Victoria Land (Antarctica) inferred from the integration of GPS data and geologic setting. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SPACE PHYSICS, 115 [10.1029/2009JB007123].

Active tectonics in northern Victoria Land (Antarctica) inferred from the integration of GPS data and geologic setting

CIANFARRA, Paola;SALVINI, Francesco
2010-01-01

Abstract

A semipermanent Global Positioning System (GPS) network of 30 vertices known as the Victoria Land Network for Deformation Control (VLNDEF) was set up in the Austral summer of 1998 in northern Victoria Land (NVL), including Terra Nova Bay (TNB), Antarctica. The locations were selected according to the known Cenozoic fault framework, which is characterized by a system of NW‐SE regional faults with right‐lateral, strike‐slip kinematics. The TNB1 permanent GPS station is within the VLNDEF, and following its installation on a bedrock monument in October 1998, it has been recording almost continuously. The GPS network has been surveyed routinely every two summers, using high‐quality, dual‐frequency GPS receivers. In this study we present the results of a distributed session approach applied to the processing of the GPS data of the VLNDEF. An improved reference frame definition was implemented, including a new Euler pole, to compute the Antarctic intraplate residual velocities. The projection of the residual velocities on the main faults in NVL show present‐day activities for some faults, including the Tucker, Leap Year, Lanterman, Aviator, and David faults, with right‐lateral strike‐slip kinematics and local extensional and compressional components. This active fault pattern divides NVL into eight rigid blocks, each characterized by its relative movements and rigid rotations. These show velocities of up to several millimeters per year, which are comparable to those predicted by plate tectonic theory at active plate margins.
Dubbini, M., Cianfarra, P., Casula, G., Capra, A., Salvini, F. (2010). Active tectonics in northern Victoria Land (Antarctica) inferred from the integration of GPS data and geologic setting. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: SPACE PHYSICS, 115 [10.1029/2009JB007123].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/152713
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