Flashbulb memories(FBMs) are defined as detailed memories for the reception context in which people first heard of a public and emotionally relevant event. For many years researchers have been debating whether FBMs can be considered a special class of emotional memories, or whether they suffer the same fate as ordinary autobiographical formations. The debate on the real existence of this special class of memories reflects the difficulty of establishing their accuracy. Three indices have been defined as proxies for FBM accuracy: specificity of recalled details, individuals' confidence in their memory, and memory consistency over time. However, all approaches to FBM assessment have been based on explicit self-report measures. In two studies we aimed to detect FBMs for two emotional public events, by simultaneously employing explicit traditional FBM measures and implicit measures based on the autobiographical Implicit Association Test (aIAT). Jointly considered, the results from the two studies showed that the implicit measures were able to discriminate a FBM, and appeared significantly associated with explicit traditional measures of FBM Specificity, Confidence, and Consistency. Both explicit and implicit assessments concurred to correctly estimate a FBM. Implications for the FBM debate are discussed. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

Lanciano, T., Curci, A., Mastandrea, S., Sartori, G. (2013). Do automatic mental associations detect a flashbulb memory?. MEMORY, 21(4), 482-493 [10.1080/09658211.2012.740050].

Do automatic mental associations detect a flashbulb memory?

MASTANDREA, STEFANO;
2013

Abstract

Flashbulb memories(FBMs) are defined as detailed memories for the reception context in which people first heard of a public and emotionally relevant event. For many years researchers have been debating whether FBMs can be considered a special class of emotional memories, or whether they suffer the same fate as ordinary autobiographical formations. The debate on the real existence of this special class of memories reflects the difficulty of establishing their accuracy. Three indices have been defined as proxies for FBM accuracy: specificity of recalled details, individuals' confidence in their memory, and memory consistency over time. However, all approaches to FBM assessment have been based on explicit self-report measures. In two studies we aimed to detect FBMs for two emotional public events, by simultaneously employing explicit traditional FBM measures and implicit measures based on the autobiographical Implicit Association Test (aIAT). Jointly considered, the results from the two studies showed that the implicit measures were able to discriminate a FBM, and appeared significantly associated with explicit traditional measures of FBM Specificity, Confidence, and Consistency. Both explicit and implicit assessments concurred to correctly estimate a FBM. Implications for the FBM debate are discussed. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
Lanciano, T., Curci, A., Mastandrea, S., Sartori, G. (2013). Do automatic mental associations detect a flashbulb memory?. MEMORY, 21(4), 482-493 [10.1080/09658211.2012.740050].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/287353
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