Polyandry is a widespread mating strategy, found in a broad number of taxa. Among amphibians, polyandry, and multiple paternity as its direct consequence, is quite common in salamanders, especially within Ambystomatidae and Plethodontidae. In the suborder Salamadroidea the existence of two different types of spermatheca allows several kinds of polyandry strategies to appear. We used multilocus microsatellite genotyping to investigate the presence of polyandry and its effects on the paternity in a previously unstudied species with a terrestrial habit, Salamandrina perspicillata. We collected gravid females in their natural habitat and analysed the paternity of the offspring by using the software COLONY and GERUD. We found that all the analysed clutches had been fertilized by 2-4 males and that in every clutch one male had sired most of the offspring. Our results confirmed that polyandry is an important component of the mating system of this species, suggesting that females are able to recognize the sperm of the male that will provide a genetic benefit for their offspring. We found evidence of female cryptic choice based on males' genetic dissimilarity: (1) males who sire most of the offspring of a given female tend to be genetically different from their sexual partner; (2) a same male, when mated with two females, sired a proportion of the offspring inversely correlated with his genetic similarity to the female; (3) genetic dissimilarity between mating partners is positively correlated with offspring heterozygosity. According to the genetic compatibility model, we hypothesized that in the observed non resource-based mating system the indirect benefit for the offspring should reflect interactions between paternal and maternal genomes rather than the inheritance of the so-called 'good genes'. This study suggests a polygynandrous mating system for the study species and provides the first report in a salamandrid species in natural condition that reproductive success of males is correlated with genetic dissimilarity between mates. Moreover, we found evidence of an offspring benefit (higher heterozygosity) derived from the most genetically dissimilar father.

Rovelli, V., Randi, E., Davoli, F., Macale, D., Bologna, M.A., Vignoli, L. (2015). She gets many and she chooses the best: Polygynandry in Salamandrina perspicillata (Amphibia: Salamandridae). BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY, 116(3), 671-683 [10.1111/bij.12613].

She gets many and she chooses the best: Polygynandry in Salamandrina perspicillata (Amphibia: Salamandridae)

ROVELLI, VALENTINA;BOLOGNA, Marco Alberto;VIGNOLI, LEONARDO
2015

Abstract

Polyandry is a widespread mating strategy, found in a broad number of taxa. Among amphibians, polyandry, and multiple paternity as its direct consequence, is quite common in salamanders, especially within Ambystomatidae and Plethodontidae. In the suborder Salamadroidea the existence of two different types of spermatheca allows several kinds of polyandry strategies to appear. We used multilocus microsatellite genotyping to investigate the presence of polyandry and its effects on the paternity in a previously unstudied species with a terrestrial habit, Salamandrina perspicillata. We collected gravid females in their natural habitat and analysed the paternity of the offspring by using the software COLONY and GERUD. We found that all the analysed clutches had been fertilized by 2-4 males and that in every clutch one male had sired most of the offspring. Our results confirmed that polyandry is an important component of the mating system of this species, suggesting that females are able to recognize the sperm of the male that will provide a genetic benefit for their offspring. We found evidence of female cryptic choice based on males' genetic dissimilarity: (1) males who sire most of the offspring of a given female tend to be genetically different from their sexual partner; (2) a same male, when mated with two females, sired a proportion of the offspring inversely correlated with his genetic similarity to the female; (3) genetic dissimilarity between mating partners is positively correlated with offspring heterozygosity. According to the genetic compatibility model, we hypothesized that in the observed non resource-based mating system the indirect benefit for the offspring should reflect interactions between paternal and maternal genomes rather than the inheritance of the so-called 'good genes'. This study suggests a polygynandrous mating system for the study species and provides the first report in a salamandrid species in natural condition that reproductive success of males is correlated with genetic dissimilarity between mates. Moreover, we found evidence of an offspring benefit (higher heterozygosity) derived from the most genetically dissimilar father.
Rovelli, V., Randi, E., Davoli, F., Macale, D., Bologna, M.A., Vignoli, L. (2015). She gets many and she chooses the best: Polygynandry in Salamandrina perspicillata (Amphibia: Salamandridae). BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY, 116(3), 671-683 [10.1111/bij.12613].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/309269
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