In the European regulatory framework, private-law principles, and primarily party autonomy, may be interpreted as legal tools oriented beyond the interests of the single individuals involved in commercial transactions, and rather connected to the superior objectives of the Internal Market, and of the European Economic Constitution. Looking from this perspective at the regulation of Business-Client relationships, while it is clear that the strong interrelation of autonomy/heteronomy elements in commercial transactions calls for a methodological approach capable of providing an integrated view of regulation and private law, it also emerges that, up to now, similar attempts have been developed mainly within contract theory. The aim of this article is to test whether the regulatory perspective of European private law allows the regulation of Business-Client relationships through standards and rules not directly taken from contract law, but also originated in other, formally different, legal branches. More specifically attention in centred on corporate law, intended as that part of commercial law which defines the internal structure of the firm. Focus is thus put on organisational rules which are relevant within an incorporated business: the analysis starts from national rules, anchored to the traditional partition between civil law and commercial law; then it traces their rationale within the European framework, looking for hermeneutical insights capable of providing a more unified interpretation of those rules when framed back at a national level, as standards of regulatory private law.

Mezzanotte, F. (2017). Regulation of Business-Clients Relationships through ‘Organisational Law’. EUROPEAN REVIEW OF CONTRACT LAW, 2017(2), 123-163.

Regulation of Business-Clients Relationships through ‘Organisational Law’

MEZZANOTTE, FRANCESCO
2017-01-01

Abstract

In the European regulatory framework, private-law principles, and primarily party autonomy, may be interpreted as legal tools oriented beyond the interests of the single individuals involved in commercial transactions, and rather connected to the superior objectives of the Internal Market, and of the European Economic Constitution. Looking from this perspective at the regulation of Business-Client relationships, while it is clear that the strong interrelation of autonomy/heteronomy elements in commercial transactions calls for a methodological approach capable of providing an integrated view of regulation and private law, it also emerges that, up to now, similar attempts have been developed mainly within contract theory. The aim of this article is to test whether the regulatory perspective of European private law allows the regulation of Business-Client relationships through standards and rules not directly taken from contract law, but also originated in other, formally different, legal branches. More specifically attention in centred on corporate law, intended as that part of commercial law which defines the internal structure of the firm. Focus is thus put on organisational rules which are relevant within an incorporated business: the analysis starts from national rules, anchored to the traditional partition between civil law and commercial law; then it traces their rationale within the European framework, looking for hermeneutical insights capable of providing a more unified interpretation of those rules when framed back at a national level, as standards of regulatory private law.
Mezzanotte, F. (2017). Regulation of Business-Clients Relationships through ‘Organisational Law’. EUROPEAN REVIEW OF CONTRACT LAW, 2017(2), 123-163.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/313099
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