Environmental factors or adverse growth conditions that may reduce cell function or viability are considered stress. The cell ability to sense and respond to environmental stresses determine its function and survival destiny. We recently defined Neuroglobin (NGB), a heme-protein, as a compensatory protein in the 17β-Estradiol (E2) anti-apoptotic activity and as a sensor of oxidative stress in both neurons and breast cancer cells. Here, the possibility that NGB levels could represent a pivotal regulator of integrated response of cancer cells to stress has been evaluated. Data obtained in neuroblastoma and in breast cancer cell lines evidence that nutrient deprivation significantly up-regulated NGB levels at different time points. However, the analysis of autophagy activation led to exclude any possible role of stress- or E2-induced NGB in the upstream regulation of general autophagy. However, the over-expression of Flag-NGB in ERα stable transfected HEK-293 cells completely affects nutrient deprivation-induced decrease in cell number. In addition, reported results indicate that modulation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 level may play a key role in the protective NGB function against energetic stress. Overall, these data define a role of NGB as compensatory protein in the cell machinery activated in response to stress and as general stress adaptation marker of cancer cells susceptible to oxidative stress, oxygen and, as demonstrated here for the first time, even to nutrient willingness. Despite the lacking of any direct NGB role on autophagic flux activated by energetic stress, NGB upregulation appears functional in delaying stress-related cell death allowing an appropriate cell response and adaptation to the changing extracellular conditions.

Fiocchetti, M., Cipolletti, M., Marino, M. (2017). Compensatory role of Neuroglobin in nervous and non-nervous cancer cells in response to the nutrient deprivation. PLOS ONE, 12(12), e0189179 [10.1371/journal.pone.0189179].

Compensatory role of Neuroglobin in nervous and non-nervous cancer cells in response to the nutrient deprivation

Fiocchetti, Marco
;
Cipolletti, Manuela;Marino, Maria
2017-01-01

Abstract

Environmental factors or adverse growth conditions that may reduce cell function or viability are considered stress. The cell ability to sense and respond to environmental stresses determine its function and survival destiny. We recently defined Neuroglobin (NGB), a heme-protein, as a compensatory protein in the 17β-Estradiol (E2) anti-apoptotic activity and as a sensor of oxidative stress in both neurons and breast cancer cells. Here, the possibility that NGB levels could represent a pivotal regulator of integrated response of cancer cells to stress has been evaluated. Data obtained in neuroblastoma and in breast cancer cell lines evidence that nutrient deprivation significantly up-regulated NGB levels at different time points. However, the analysis of autophagy activation led to exclude any possible role of stress- or E2-induced NGB in the upstream regulation of general autophagy. However, the over-expression of Flag-NGB in ERα stable transfected HEK-293 cells completely affects nutrient deprivation-induced decrease in cell number. In addition, reported results indicate that modulation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 level may play a key role in the protective NGB function against energetic stress. Overall, these data define a role of NGB as compensatory protein in the cell machinery activated in response to stress and as general stress adaptation marker of cancer cells susceptible to oxidative stress, oxygen and, as demonstrated here for the first time, even to nutrient willingness. Despite the lacking of any direct NGB role on autophagic flux activated by energetic stress, NGB upregulation appears functional in delaying stress-related cell death allowing an appropriate cell response and adaptation to the changing extracellular conditions.
Fiocchetti, M., Cipolletti, M., Marino, M. (2017). Compensatory role of Neuroglobin in nervous and non-nervous cancer cells in response to the nutrient deprivation. PLOS ONE, 12(12), e0189179 [10.1371/journal.pone.0189179].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/327255
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