The aim of this paper was to investigate the functional composition of the understory of Mediterranean beech forest stands that have been managed in two different ways, namely, coppicing and tree by tree harvesting. In particular, we used a trait-based approach to characterize old coppice and high forest stands, analyzing their differences and evaluating the status of old coppices by considering their conversion towards high forest stands. The study area was the Montagne della Duchessa massif in central Italy, which lies at the center of the Apennine chain. Sixty-six plots were laid out and their species abundance and structural parameters were recorded. Data on plant traits were collected using both European databases and the literature available. Redundancy analysis was performed to assess the relationship between trait states and management, and forward selection was used to identify the structural parameters with a significant effect on trait variability. A Wilcoxon Rank-Sum test was done to assess differences in trait states between the management types. High forests proved to be more related to traits typical of mature forest conditions, while old coppices seemed not to have a clear trait association, except for some trait states related to open habitats, and showed the same “mature forest” trait composition, even if with lower abundances. This indicates that, despite the higher initial disturbance pressure, once abandoned, old coppices tend over time to evolve naturally towards mature forest functional conditions.

Scolastri, A., Bricca, A., Cancellieri, L., Cutini, M. (2017). Understory functional response to different management strategies in Mediterranean beech forests (central Apennines, Italy). FOREST ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT, 400, 665-676 [10.1016/j.foreco.2017.06.049].

Understory functional response to different management strategies in Mediterranean beech forests (central Apennines, Italy)

SCOLASTRI, ANDREA;BRICCA, ALESSANDRO;Cancellieri, Laura;Cutini, Maurizio
2017-01-01

Abstract

The aim of this paper was to investigate the functional composition of the understory of Mediterranean beech forest stands that have been managed in two different ways, namely, coppicing and tree by tree harvesting. In particular, we used a trait-based approach to characterize old coppice and high forest stands, analyzing their differences and evaluating the status of old coppices by considering their conversion towards high forest stands. The study area was the Montagne della Duchessa massif in central Italy, which lies at the center of the Apennine chain. Sixty-six plots were laid out and their species abundance and structural parameters were recorded. Data on plant traits were collected using both European databases and the literature available. Redundancy analysis was performed to assess the relationship between trait states and management, and forward selection was used to identify the structural parameters with a significant effect on trait variability. A Wilcoxon Rank-Sum test was done to assess differences in trait states between the management types. High forests proved to be more related to traits typical of mature forest conditions, while old coppices seemed not to have a clear trait association, except for some trait states related to open habitats, and showed the same “mature forest” trait composition, even if with lower abundances. This indicates that, despite the higher initial disturbance pressure, once abandoned, old coppices tend over time to evolve naturally towards mature forest functional conditions.
Scolastri, A., Bricca, A., Cancellieri, L., Cutini, M. (2017). Understory functional response to different management strategies in Mediterranean beech forests (central Apennines, Italy). FOREST ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT, 400, 665-676 [10.1016/j.foreco.2017.06.049].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/330373
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