Suicide is a major cause of death in schizophrenia. Neurobiological studies suggest that suicidality is associated with abnormal brain structure and connectivity in fronto-temporo-limbic regions. However, it is still unclear whether suicidality in schizophrenia is related to volumetric abnormalities in subcortical structures that play a key role in emotion regulation, aggression and impulse control. Therefore, we aimed to examine whether the volume of selected subcortical regions is associated with previous suicidal attempts and self-aggression in schizophrenia. For this cross-sectional study, we recruited 50 outpatients with schizophrenia and 50 healthy controls (HC) matched for age and gender. Fourteen patients had a history of one or more suicide attempts. Different forms of aggression were assessed using the Modified Overt Aggression Scale. All participants underwent structural MR imaging at 3 Tesla. Physical volumetric measures were calculated for the lateral ventricles, thalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, caudate, putamen, pallidum and accumbens using an automatic segmentation method on T1-weighted high-resolution (voxel size 1×1×1mm3) images. Multivariate and follow-up univariate ANOVAs revealed a selective increase in volume in the right amygdala of patients with a history of suicidality compared both to patients without such a history and HC. Moreover, in the entire patient group increased right amygdala volume was related to increased self-aggression. Our findings suggest that right amygdala hypertrophy may be a risk factor for suicide attempts in patients with schizophrenia and this could be relevant for suicide prevention. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

Spoletini, I., Piras, F., Fagioli, S., Rubino, I.A., Martinotti, G., Siracusano, A., et al. (2011). Suicidal attempts and increased right amygdala volume in schizophrenia. SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, 125(1), 30-40 [10.1016/j.schres.2010.08.023].

Suicidal attempts and increased right amygdala volume in schizophrenia

Fagioli, Sabrina;
2011-01-01

Abstract

Suicide is a major cause of death in schizophrenia. Neurobiological studies suggest that suicidality is associated with abnormal brain structure and connectivity in fronto-temporo-limbic regions. However, it is still unclear whether suicidality in schizophrenia is related to volumetric abnormalities in subcortical structures that play a key role in emotion regulation, aggression and impulse control. Therefore, we aimed to examine whether the volume of selected subcortical regions is associated with previous suicidal attempts and self-aggression in schizophrenia. For this cross-sectional study, we recruited 50 outpatients with schizophrenia and 50 healthy controls (HC) matched for age and gender. Fourteen patients had a history of one or more suicide attempts. Different forms of aggression were assessed using the Modified Overt Aggression Scale. All participants underwent structural MR imaging at 3 Tesla. Physical volumetric measures were calculated for the lateral ventricles, thalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, caudate, putamen, pallidum and accumbens using an automatic segmentation method on T1-weighted high-resolution (voxel size 1×1×1mm3) images. Multivariate and follow-up univariate ANOVAs revealed a selective increase in volume in the right amygdala of patients with a history of suicidality compared both to patients without such a history and HC. Moreover, in the entire patient group increased right amygdala volume was related to increased self-aggression. Our findings suggest that right amygdala hypertrophy may be a risk factor for suicide attempts in patients with schizophrenia and this could be relevant for suicide prevention. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.
2011
Spoletini, I., Piras, F., Fagioli, S., Rubino, I.A., Martinotti, G., Siracusano, A., et al. (2011). Suicidal attempts and increased right amygdala volume in schizophrenia. SCHIZOPHRENIA RESEARCH, 125(1), 30-40 [10.1016/j.schres.2010.08.023].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/348521
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