Cantharidin (CA), a toxic terpene produced by blister beetles (Coleoptera: Meloidae), attracts the interest of many researchers for its renowned medical properties. The CA content in blister beetles has been mainly quantified in some Oriental species, due to their use in traditional Chinese medicine, or in few other species of toxicological importance. As CA quantification has been largely ignored in many other members of this family, we aimed at estimating CA content in natural populations of two of the most abundant species in central Italy, Mylabris variabilis and Lydus trimaculatus. Nearly 100 individuals for each species were collected in the field, identified and reared in fauna-boxes until CA collection. Available protocols were optimized for CA extraction from both dried-body tissues and exuded hemolymph collected from leg joints using capillary tubes. The CA content was quantified in a gas chromatography system coupled to a mass spectrometer using a calibration curve with diethyl-ester of norcantharidin as the internal standard. We observed: (i) high variability in CA content among specimens, which was positively related to individual dry-weight; and (ii) slightly larger (though non-significant) amount of CA in males than in females for both species. Our data are consistent with the available published reports about CA content, transfer and distribution in blister beetles and suggest a conserved biological role of this terpene in Meloidae.

Gisondi, S., Gasperi, T., Roma, E., Tomai, P., Gentili, A., Vignoli, L., et al. (2019). Cantharidin content in two Mediterranean species of blister beetles, Lydus trimaculatus and Mylabris variabilis (Coleoptera: Meloidae). ENTOMOLOGICAL SCIENCE, 22, 258-263 [10.1111/ens.12364].

Cantharidin content in two Mediterranean species of blister beetles, Lydus trimaculatus and Mylabris variabilis (Coleoptera: Meloidae)

T. GASPERI;E. ROMA;L. VIGNOLI;M. A. BOLOGNA;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Cantharidin (CA), a toxic terpene produced by blister beetles (Coleoptera: Meloidae), attracts the interest of many researchers for its renowned medical properties. The CA content in blister beetles has been mainly quantified in some Oriental species, due to their use in traditional Chinese medicine, or in few other species of toxicological importance. As CA quantification has been largely ignored in many other members of this family, we aimed at estimating CA content in natural populations of two of the most abundant species in central Italy, Mylabris variabilis and Lydus trimaculatus. Nearly 100 individuals for each species were collected in the field, identified and reared in fauna-boxes until CA collection. Available protocols were optimized for CA extraction from both dried-body tissues and exuded hemolymph collected from leg joints using capillary tubes. The CA content was quantified in a gas chromatography system coupled to a mass spectrometer using a calibration curve with diethyl-ester of norcantharidin as the internal standard. We observed: (i) high variability in CA content among specimens, which was positively related to individual dry-weight; and (ii) slightly larger (though non-significant) amount of CA in males than in females for both species. Our data are consistent with the available published reports about CA content, transfer and distribution in blister beetles and suggest a conserved biological role of this terpene in Meloidae.
Gisondi, S., Gasperi, T., Roma, E., Tomai, P., Gentili, A., Vignoli, L., et al. (2019). Cantharidin content in two Mediterranean species of blister beetles, Lydus trimaculatus and Mylabris variabilis (Coleoptera: Meloidae). ENTOMOLOGICAL SCIENCE, 22, 258-263 [10.1111/ens.12364].
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/351909
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 5
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 6
social impact