Naturally occurring 222Rn is increasingly recognized as a powerful environmental tracer in hydrology. Radon-in-water concentrations can be measured in the field by stripping radon from a water sample into a gas volume and measuring the respective radon-in-gas concentration using a portable radon-in-gas monitor. Alternatively, radon is firstly extracted from the water body by diffusion through a radon exchanger such as polypropylene (PP) tubing and then is measured using a radon-in-gas monitor, connected in closed-loop to the PP membrane. The paper discusses results of field experiments in which the Radon-in-Water Probe (Durridge co.), a 2.2 m long PP tubing, connected to a RAD7 monitor (method A), is used to determine dissolved radon concentration in four water bodies characterised by different water flow velocity and radon concentration. The efficiency of this method is validated by comparison with two established methods, gamma-ray spectrometer + charcoal canister (method B) and RAD7 monitor + Big Bottle RAD H20 accessory (method C). Relative efficiency of method A is directly proportional to water flow velocity, ranging from about 0.50 ± 0.05 at 0.01 m/s to about 0.92 ± 0.08 at 0.57 m/s. A minimum of 2–3 h are needed to collect enough records to asymptotically fit radon-in-gas data and obtain equilibrium radon concentration, which is then converted into radon-in water concentration, considering the temperature-dependency of radon partition coefficient between water and air. Equilibrium condition is reached after about 6–8 h. No correlation was found between relative efficiency and radon concentration. An equation is proposed to correct radon data as a function of water flow velocity, even for poorly moving water bodies. The DURRIDGE Water Probe is useful to monitor radon-in-water levels, without the potential risk of radon loss during water sampling and sample handling. However, it must be pointed out that duplicate or triplicate sampling using other methods similarly permit to evaluate whether radon loss is an issue.

Lucchetti, C., Briganti, A., Semenza, D., Castelluccio, M., Galli, G., Soligo, M., et al. (2019). Testing the radon-in-water probe set-up for the measurement of radon in water bodies. RADIATION MEASUREMENTS, 128, 106179 [10.1016/j.radmeas.2019.106179].

Testing the radon-in-water probe set-up for the measurement of radon in water bodies

Briganti A.;Soligo M.;Tuccimei P.
2019-01-01

Abstract

Naturally occurring 222Rn is increasingly recognized as a powerful environmental tracer in hydrology. Radon-in-water concentrations can be measured in the field by stripping radon from a water sample into a gas volume and measuring the respective radon-in-gas concentration using a portable radon-in-gas monitor. Alternatively, radon is firstly extracted from the water body by diffusion through a radon exchanger such as polypropylene (PP) tubing and then is measured using a radon-in-gas monitor, connected in closed-loop to the PP membrane. The paper discusses results of field experiments in which the Radon-in-Water Probe (Durridge co.), a 2.2 m long PP tubing, connected to a RAD7 monitor (method A), is used to determine dissolved radon concentration in four water bodies characterised by different water flow velocity and radon concentration. The efficiency of this method is validated by comparison with two established methods, gamma-ray spectrometer + charcoal canister (method B) and RAD7 monitor + Big Bottle RAD H20 accessory (method C). Relative efficiency of method A is directly proportional to water flow velocity, ranging from about 0.50 ± 0.05 at 0.01 m/s to about 0.92 ± 0.08 at 0.57 m/s. A minimum of 2–3 h are needed to collect enough records to asymptotically fit radon-in-gas data and obtain equilibrium radon concentration, which is then converted into radon-in water concentration, considering the temperature-dependency of radon partition coefficient between water and air. Equilibrium condition is reached after about 6–8 h. No correlation was found between relative efficiency and radon concentration. An equation is proposed to correct radon data as a function of water flow velocity, even for poorly moving water bodies. The DURRIDGE Water Probe is useful to monitor radon-in-water levels, without the potential risk of radon loss during water sampling and sample handling. However, it must be pointed out that duplicate or triplicate sampling using other methods similarly permit to evaluate whether radon loss is an issue.
2019
Lucchetti, C., Briganti, A., Semenza, D., Castelluccio, M., Galli, G., Soligo, M., et al. (2019). Testing the radon-in-water probe set-up for the measurement of radon in water bodies. RADIATION MEASUREMENTS, 128, 106179 [10.1016/j.radmeas.2019.106179].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/358929
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