Environmental contamination due to human activities is a worldwide problem that has led to the development of different remediation techniques, including biotechnological approaches such as phytoextraction and phytostabilization. These techniques take advantage of pioneer plants that naturally develop tolerance mechanisms to survive in extreme environments. A multi-technique and multi-disciplinary approach was applied for the investigation of Helichrysum microphyllum subsp. tyrrhenicum samples, bulk soil, and rhizospheres collected from a metal-extreme environment (Zn-Pb mine of Campo Pisano, SW Sardinia, Italy). Zinc, Pb, and Cd are the most abundant metals, with Zn attaining 3 w/w% in the rhizosphere solid materials, inducing oxidative stress in the roots as revealed by infrared microspectroscopy (IR). X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis coupled with synchrotron radiation-based (SR) techniques demonstrate that quartz, dolomite, and weddellite biominerals precipitate in roots, stems, and leaves, likely as a response to environmental stress. In the rhizosphere, Zn chemical speciation is mainly related to the Zn ore minerals (smithsonite and hydrozincite) whereas, in plant tissues, Zn is primarily bound to organic compounds such as malate, cysteine, and histidine molecules that act as metal binders and, eventually, detoxification agents for the Zn excess. These findings suggest that H. microphyllum subsp. tyrrhenicum has developed its own adaptation strategy to survive in polluted substrates, making it a potential candidate for phytostabilization aimed at mitigating the dispersion of metals in the surrounding areas.

Boi, M.E., Medas, D., Aquilanti, G., Bacchetta, G., Birarda, G., Cappai, G., et al. (2020). Mineralogy and zn chemical speciation in a soil-plant system from a metal-extreme environment: A study on helichrysum microphyllum subsp. tyrrhenicum (campo pisano mine, sw sardinia, italy). MINERALS, 10(3), 259 [10.3390/min10030259].

Mineralogy and zn chemical speciation in a soil-plant system from a metal-extreme environment: A study on helichrysum microphyllum subsp. tyrrhenicum (campo pisano mine, sw sardinia, italy)

Carlomagno I.;Meneghini C.;
2020

Abstract

Environmental contamination due to human activities is a worldwide problem that has led to the development of different remediation techniques, including biotechnological approaches such as phytoextraction and phytostabilization. These techniques take advantage of pioneer plants that naturally develop tolerance mechanisms to survive in extreme environments. A multi-technique and multi-disciplinary approach was applied for the investigation of Helichrysum microphyllum subsp. tyrrhenicum samples, bulk soil, and rhizospheres collected from a metal-extreme environment (Zn-Pb mine of Campo Pisano, SW Sardinia, Italy). Zinc, Pb, and Cd are the most abundant metals, with Zn attaining 3 w/w% in the rhizosphere solid materials, inducing oxidative stress in the roots as revealed by infrared microspectroscopy (IR). X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and chemical analysis coupled with synchrotron radiation-based (SR) techniques demonstrate that quartz, dolomite, and weddellite biominerals precipitate in roots, stems, and leaves, likely as a response to environmental stress. In the rhizosphere, Zn chemical speciation is mainly related to the Zn ore minerals (smithsonite and hydrozincite) whereas, in plant tissues, Zn is primarily bound to organic compounds such as malate, cysteine, and histidine molecules that act as metal binders and, eventually, detoxification agents for the Zn excess. These findings suggest that H. microphyllum subsp. tyrrhenicum has developed its own adaptation strategy to survive in polluted substrates, making it a potential candidate for phytostabilization aimed at mitigating the dispersion of metals in the surrounding areas.
Boi, M.E., Medas, D., Aquilanti, G., Bacchetta, G., Birarda, G., Cappai, G., et al. (2020). Mineralogy and zn chemical speciation in a soil-plant system from a metal-extreme environment: A study on helichrysum microphyllum subsp. tyrrhenicum (campo pisano mine, sw sardinia, italy). MINERALS, 10(3), 259 [10.3390/min10030259].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/375090
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