Colistin represents the last-line treatment option against many multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Several lines of evidence indicate that aminoarabinosylation of the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an essential step for the development of colistin resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, whether it is sufficient to confer resistance in this bacterium remains unclear. The aim of this work was to investigate the specific contribution of lipid A aminoarabinosylation to colistin resistance in P. aeruginosa and evaluate the effect of this resistance mechanism on bacterial fitness. Recombinant strains constitutively expressing the enzymes for lipid A aminoarabinosylation were generated in a small collection of reference and clinical isolates and verified by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), lipid A extraction and mass spectrometry. The effect of aminoarabinosylated lipid A on colistin resistance was found to be strain- and culture condition-dependent. Higher levels of resistance were generally obtained in the presence of divalent cations, which appear to be important for aminoarabinosylation-mediated colistin resistance. High colistin resistance was also observed for most strains in human serum and in artificial sputum medium, which should partly mimic growth conditions during infection. The results of growth, biofilm, cell envelope integrity and Galleria mellonella infection assays indicate that lipid A aminoarabinosylation does not cause relevant fitness costs in P. aeruginosa.

Lo Sciuto, A., Cervoni, M., Stefanelli, R., Mancone, C., & Imperi, F. (2020). Effect of lipid A aminoarabinosylation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa colistin resistance and fitness. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS, 55(5), 105957 [10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2020.105957].

Effect of lipid A aminoarabinosylation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa colistin resistance and fitness

Lo Sciuto A.;Cervoni M.;Imperi F.
2020

Abstract

Colistin represents the last-line treatment option against many multidrug-resistant Gram-negative pathogens. Several lines of evidence indicate that aminoarabinosylation of the lipid A moiety of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an essential step for the development of colistin resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, whether it is sufficient to confer resistance in this bacterium remains unclear. The aim of this work was to investigate the specific contribution of lipid A aminoarabinosylation to colistin resistance in P. aeruginosa and evaluate the effect of this resistance mechanism on bacterial fitness. Recombinant strains constitutively expressing the enzymes for lipid A aminoarabinosylation were generated in a small collection of reference and clinical isolates and verified by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), lipid A extraction and mass spectrometry. The effect of aminoarabinosylated lipid A on colistin resistance was found to be strain- and culture condition-dependent. Higher levels of resistance were generally obtained in the presence of divalent cations, which appear to be important for aminoarabinosylation-mediated colistin resistance. High colistin resistance was also observed for most strains in human serum and in artificial sputum medium, which should partly mimic growth conditions during infection. The results of growth, biofilm, cell envelope integrity and Galleria mellonella infection assays indicate that lipid A aminoarabinosylation does not cause relevant fitness costs in P. aeruginosa.
Lo Sciuto, A., Cervoni, M., Stefanelli, R., Mancone, C., & Imperi, F. (2020). Effect of lipid A aminoarabinosylation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa colistin resistance and fitness. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS, 55(5), 105957 [10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2020.105957].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/375145
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