The southern margin of the Central Anatolian Plateau (CAP) records a strong uplift phase after the early Middle Pleistocene, which has been related to the slab break‐off of the subducting Arabian plate beneath the Anatolian microplate. During the last 450 kyr the area underwent an uplift phase at a mean rate of ~3.2 m/kyr, as suggested by Middle Pleistocene marine sediments exposed at ~1,500 m above sea level. These values are significantly higher than the 1.0–1.5 m/kyr estimated since the Late Pleistocene, suggesting temporal variations in uplift rate. To estimate changes in uplift rate during the Pleistocene we studied the marine terraces along the CAP southern margin, mapping the remnants of the platforms and their associated deposits in the field, and used the TerraceM software to identify the position and elevation of associated shoreline angles. We used shoreline angles and the timing of Quaternary marine sedimentation as constrains for a Landscape Evolution Model that simulates wave erosion of an uplifting coast. We applied random optimization algorithms and minimization statistics to find the input parameters that better reproduce the morphology of CAP marine terraces. The best‐fitting uplift rate history suggests a significative increase from 1.9 to 3.5 m/kyr between 500 and 200 kyr, followed by an abrupt decrease to 1.4 m/kyr until the present. Our results agree with slab break‐off models, which suggest a strong uplift pulse during slab rupture followed by a smoother decrease.

Racano, S., Jara‐muñoz, J., Cosentino, D., Melnick, D. (2020). Variable Quaternary Uplift Along the Southern Margin of the Central Anatolian Plateau Inferred From Modeling Marine Terrace Sequences. TECTONICS, 39(12) [10.1029/2019TC005921].

Variable Quaternary Uplift Along the Southern Margin of the Central Anatolian Plateau Inferred From Modeling Marine Terrace Sequences

Racano, Simone
;
Cosentino, Domenico;
2020-01-01

Abstract

The southern margin of the Central Anatolian Plateau (CAP) records a strong uplift phase after the early Middle Pleistocene, which has been related to the slab break‐off of the subducting Arabian plate beneath the Anatolian microplate. During the last 450 kyr the area underwent an uplift phase at a mean rate of ~3.2 m/kyr, as suggested by Middle Pleistocene marine sediments exposed at ~1,500 m above sea level. These values are significantly higher than the 1.0–1.5 m/kyr estimated since the Late Pleistocene, suggesting temporal variations in uplift rate. To estimate changes in uplift rate during the Pleistocene we studied the marine terraces along the CAP southern margin, mapping the remnants of the platforms and their associated deposits in the field, and used the TerraceM software to identify the position and elevation of associated shoreline angles. We used shoreline angles and the timing of Quaternary marine sedimentation as constrains for a Landscape Evolution Model that simulates wave erosion of an uplifting coast. We applied random optimization algorithms and minimization statistics to find the input parameters that better reproduce the morphology of CAP marine terraces. The best‐fitting uplift rate history suggests a significative increase from 1.9 to 3.5 m/kyr between 500 and 200 kyr, followed by an abrupt decrease to 1.4 m/kyr until the present. Our results agree with slab break‐off models, which suggest a strong uplift pulse during slab rupture followed by a smoother decrease.
Racano, S., Jara‐muñoz, J., Cosentino, D., Melnick, D. (2020). Variable Quaternary Uplift Along the Southern Margin of the Central Anatolian Plateau Inferred From Modeling Marine Terrace Sequences. TECTONICS, 39(12) [10.1029/2019TC005921].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/375546
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