Polyamines are small positively charged alkylamines that are essential in a number of crucial eukaryotic processes, like normal cell growth and development. In normal physiological conditions, intracellular polyamine content is tightly regulated through a fine regulated network of biosynthetic and catabolic enzymes and a transport system. The dysregulation of this network is frequently associated to different tumors, where high levels of polyamines has been detected. Polyamines also modulate ion channels and ionotropic glutamate receptors and altered levels of polyamines have been observed in different brain diseases, including mental disorders and epilepsy. The goal of this article is to review the role of polyamines in mental disorders and epilepsy within a frame of the possible link between these two brain pathologies. The high comorbidity between these two neurological illnesses is strongly suggestive that they share a common background in the central nervous system. This review proposes an additional association between the noradrenalin/serotonin and glutamatergic neuronal circuits with polyamines. Polyamines can be considered supplementary defensive shielding molecules, important to protect the brain from the development of epilepsy and mental illnesses that are caused by different types of neurons. In this contest, the modulation of polyamine metabolism may be a novel important target for the prevention and therapeutic treatment of these diseases that have a high impact on the costs of public health and considerably affect quality of life.

Baroli, G., Sanchez, J.R., Agostinelli, E., Mariottini, P., Cervelli, M. (2020). Polyamines: The possible missing link between mental disorders and epilepsy (Review). INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR MEDICINE, 45(1), 3-9 [10.3892/ijmm.2019.4401].

Polyamines: The possible missing link between mental disorders and epilepsy (Review)

Baroli G.;Mariottini P.;Cervelli M.
2020

Abstract

Polyamines are small positively charged alkylamines that are essential in a number of crucial eukaryotic processes, like normal cell growth and development. In normal physiological conditions, intracellular polyamine content is tightly regulated through a fine regulated network of biosynthetic and catabolic enzymes and a transport system. The dysregulation of this network is frequently associated to different tumors, where high levels of polyamines has been detected. Polyamines also modulate ion channels and ionotropic glutamate receptors and altered levels of polyamines have been observed in different brain diseases, including mental disorders and epilepsy. The goal of this article is to review the role of polyamines in mental disorders and epilepsy within a frame of the possible link between these two brain pathologies. The high comorbidity between these two neurological illnesses is strongly suggestive that they share a common background in the central nervous system. This review proposes an additional association between the noradrenalin/serotonin and glutamatergic neuronal circuits with polyamines. Polyamines can be considered supplementary defensive shielding molecules, important to protect the brain from the development of epilepsy and mental illnesses that are caused by different types of neurons. In this contest, the modulation of polyamine metabolism may be a novel important target for the prevention and therapeutic treatment of these diseases that have a high impact on the costs of public health and considerably affect quality of life.
Baroli, G., Sanchez, J.R., Agostinelli, E., Mariottini, P., Cervelli, M. (2020). Polyamines: The possible missing link between mental disorders and epilepsy (Review). INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR MEDICINE, 45(1), 3-9 [10.3892/ijmm.2019.4401].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/377187
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