Understanding how psychological processes drive human energy choices is an urgent, and yet relatively under-investigated, need for contemporary society. A knowledge gap still persists on the links between psychological factors identified in earlier studies and people's behaviors in the energy domain. This research applies a meta-analytical procedure to assess the strength of the associations between five different classes of individual variables (i.e.,: attitudes, intentions, values, awareness, and emotions) and energy-saving behavioral intentions and behaviors (self-reported and actual). Based on a systematic review of studies published between 2007 and 2017, we estimate the average effect size of predictor-criterion relations, and we assess relevant moderators and publication bias, drawing on data obtained from 102 independent samples reported in 67 published studies (N = 59.948). Results from a series of five single meta-analyses reveal a pattern of significant positive associations between the selected psychological determinants and energy-saving indicators: associations between individual-level predictors and energy-saving outcomes are positive and moderate in size, ranging from large effects for emotions to small-moderate effects for pro-environmental values. Interestingly, moderation analysis reveals, among other things, that attitude-behavior links are not statistically significant when actual behavior is considered as an outcome. Implications for policy interventions are discussed.

Carrus, G., Tiberio, L., Mastandrea, S., Chokrai, P., Fritsche, I., Klockner, C.A., et al. (2021). Psychological Predictors of Energy Saving Behavior: A Meta-Analytic Approach. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, 12, 648221 [10.3389/fpsyg.2021.648221].

Psychological Predictors of Energy Saving Behavior: A Meta-Analytic Approach

Carrus G.;Tiberio L.;Mastandrea S.;Panno A.
2021-01-01

Abstract

Understanding how psychological processes drive human energy choices is an urgent, and yet relatively under-investigated, need for contemporary society. A knowledge gap still persists on the links between psychological factors identified in earlier studies and people's behaviors in the energy domain. This research applies a meta-analytical procedure to assess the strength of the associations between five different classes of individual variables (i.e.,: attitudes, intentions, values, awareness, and emotions) and energy-saving behavioral intentions and behaviors (self-reported and actual). Based on a systematic review of studies published between 2007 and 2017, we estimate the average effect size of predictor-criterion relations, and we assess relevant moderators and publication bias, drawing on data obtained from 102 independent samples reported in 67 published studies (N = 59.948). Results from a series of five single meta-analyses reveal a pattern of significant positive associations between the selected psychological determinants and energy-saving indicators: associations between individual-level predictors and energy-saving outcomes are positive and moderate in size, ranging from large effects for emotions to small-moderate effects for pro-environmental values. Interestingly, moderation analysis reveals, among other things, that attitude-behavior links are not statistically significant when actual behavior is considered as an outcome. Implications for policy interventions are discussed.
Carrus, G., Tiberio, L., Mastandrea, S., Chokrai, P., Fritsche, I., Klockner, C.A., et al. (2021). Psychological Predictors of Energy Saving Behavior: A Meta-Analytic Approach. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, 12, 648221 [10.3389/fpsyg.2021.648221].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/396363
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