This paper discusses root phenomena in imperative clauses, assuming as diagnostics conversational dynamics and the type of discourse categories that are admitted in their C-domain, through a systematic comparative interface investigation in three languages (English, Italian and Spanish) based on an original experimental work. This novel perspective sheds new light on the syntax-semantics mapping and the interface (syntax-prosody) properties of imperative clauses, embedding the relevant proposal in a cartographic framework of analysis. Based on a twofold distinction of root phenomena – those which are widely allowed in Common Ground-active (Type I) contexts and those which can occur in non-Common Ground-active contexts (Type II) – it is proposed that imperatives are non-Common Ground-active propositions with no update potential, thus allowing only Type II root phenomena. Syntactically, imperative clauses are dominated by a super-ordinate Speech Act Phrase, including the Speaker and the Addressee as co-arguments, which explains the blocking effects identified in imperatives.

Frascarelli, M., & Jiménez-Fernández, A.L. (2021). How much room for discourse in imperatives? The lens of interface on English, Italian and Spanish. STUDIA LINGUISTICA, 75(3), 375-434 [10.1111/stul.12153].

How much room for discourse in imperatives? The lens of interface on English, Italian and Spanish.

Frascarelli, Mara
;
2021

Abstract

This paper discusses root phenomena in imperative clauses, assuming as diagnostics conversational dynamics and the type of discourse categories that are admitted in their C-domain, through a systematic comparative interface investigation in three languages (English, Italian and Spanish) based on an original experimental work. This novel perspective sheds new light on the syntax-semantics mapping and the interface (syntax-prosody) properties of imperative clauses, embedding the relevant proposal in a cartographic framework of analysis. Based on a twofold distinction of root phenomena – those which are widely allowed in Common Ground-active (Type I) contexts and those which can occur in non-Common Ground-active contexts (Type II) – it is proposed that imperatives are non-Common Ground-active propositions with no update potential, thus allowing only Type II root phenomena. Syntactically, imperative clauses are dominated by a super-ordinate Speech Act Phrase, including the Speaker and the Addressee as co-arguments, which explains the blocking effects identified in imperatives.
Frascarelli, M., & Jiménez-Fernández, A.L. (2021). How much room for discourse in imperatives? The lens of interface on English, Italian and Spanish. STUDIA LINGUISTICA, 75(3), 375-434 [10.1111/stul.12153].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11590/397505
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