The emergence of pan-resistant strains in nosocomial settings underscores the urgent need of novel therapies targeting vital bacterial functions. Bacterial iron metabolism is a fascinating target for new antimicrobials. Iron mimetic metal Ga(III) has been repurposed as an antimicrobial drug, in pre-clinical studies and recent clinical studies have raised the possibility of using Ga(III) for the treatment of P. aeruginosa pulmonary infection. Ga(III) has been approved by FDA for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune and bone resorption disorders. However, some critical issues affect the therapeutic schedule of Ga(III), principally the intra-venous (i.v.) administration, and the nephrotoxicity caused by prolonged administration. Ga(III) aerosolization could represent a viable alternative for treatment of lung infections, since delivery of antimicrobial agents to the airways maximizes drug concentration at the site of infection, improves the therapeutic efficacy, and alleviates systemic toxic effects. We demonstrate the advantage of inhaled vs i.v. administered Ga(III), in terms of bio-distribution and lung acute toxicity, by using a rat model. In vivo results support the use of Ga(III) for inhalation since intra-tracheal Ga(III) delivery improved its persistence in the lung, while the i.v. administration caused rapid clearance and did not allow to attain a significant Ga(III) concentration in this organ. Moreover, local and systemic acute toxicity following intra-tracheal administration was not observed, since no significant signs of inflammation were found. At this stage of evidence, the direct administration of Ga(III) to the lung appears feasible and safe, boosting the development of Ga(III)-based drugs for inhalation therapy.

Mitidieri, E., Visaggio, D., Frangipani, E., Turnaturi, C., Vanacore, D., Provenzano, R., et al. (2021). Intra-tracheal administration increases gallium availability in lung: implications for antibacterial chemotherapy. PHARMACOLOGICAL RESEARCH, 170, 105698 [10.1016/j.phrs.2021.105698].

Intra-tracheal administration increases gallium availability in lung: implications for antibacterial chemotherapy

Visaggio D.;Visca P.;
2021-01-01

Abstract

The emergence of pan-resistant strains in nosocomial settings underscores the urgent need of novel therapies targeting vital bacterial functions. Bacterial iron metabolism is a fascinating target for new antimicrobials. Iron mimetic metal Ga(III) has been repurposed as an antimicrobial drug, in pre-clinical studies and recent clinical studies have raised the possibility of using Ga(III) for the treatment of P. aeruginosa pulmonary infection. Ga(III) has been approved by FDA for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune and bone resorption disorders. However, some critical issues affect the therapeutic schedule of Ga(III), principally the intra-venous (i.v.) administration, and the nephrotoxicity caused by prolonged administration. Ga(III) aerosolization could represent a viable alternative for treatment of lung infections, since delivery of antimicrobial agents to the airways maximizes drug concentration at the site of infection, improves the therapeutic efficacy, and alleviates systemic toxic effects. We demonstrate the advantage of inhaled vs i.v. administered Ga(III), in terms of bio-distribution and lung acute toxicity, by using a rat model. In vivo results support the use of Ga(III) for inhalation since intra-tracheal Ga(III) delivery improved its persistence in the lung, while the i.v. administration caused rapid clearance and did not allow to attain a significant Ga(III) concentration in this organ. Moreover, local and systemic acute toxicity following intra-tracheal administration was not observed, since no significant signs of inflammation were found. At this stage of evidence, the direct administration of Ga(III) to the lung appears feasible and safe, boosting the development of Ga(III)-based drugs for inhalation therapy.
Mitidieri, E., Visaggio, D., Frangipani, E., Turnaturi, C., Vanacore, D., Provenzano, R., et al. (2021). Intra-tracheal administration increases gallium availability in lung: implications for antibacterial chemotherapy. PHARMACOLOGICAL RESEARCH, 170, 105698 [10.1016/j.phrs.2021.105698].
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/399840
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 2
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 2
social impact