Despite a long-lasting global effort, the Holy Grail quest for a protective vaccine, able to confer prevention to HIV infection, did not reach the hoped for results, nor seems able to do so in the near future. Since mucosal surfaces of the host serve as the main entry point for HIV, it seems now logical to switch from a systemic to a localized view of events, in order to reveal critical steps useful in designing new and different vaccination strategies. In this context, the recent description of the very early phases of infection, from the eclipse to the viremia peak phase, seems to define a point-of-no-return threshold after which the main HIV infection steps, i.e. the massive destruction of the CD4+CCR5+ cell pool, the destruction of the mucosal physical barrier, and the establishment of reservoir sanctuaries, have already been accomplished. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms, the timing, and the consequences of evasion mechanisms exploited by HIV are still under scrutiny. Innate immunity, as part of a rapid lymphoid stress surveillance system, is known to play a central role in host responses to many infectious agents. In particular, V©9V™2 T-cells are able to quickly respond to danger signals without the need for classical major histocompatibility complex presentation, and may act as a bridge between innate and acquired arms of immune response, being able to kill infected/transformed cells, release antimicrobial soluble factors, and increase the deployment of other innate and acquired responses. Many experimental evidences suggest a direct role of circulating V©9V™2 T-cells during HIV disease. They may exert a direct anti-HIV role by secreting chemokines competing for HIV entry coreceptors as well as other soluble antiviral factors, and by killing infected cells by cytotoxic natural killer-like mechanisms. Moreover, they were found progressively depleted and anergic in advanced stages of HIV disease, this effect being directly linked to uncontrolled HIV replication. Scarce evidences are available on the involvement of mucosal gamma/delta T-cells during the early phases of HIV infection. In particular, the relative cause/effect links between HIV infection, destruction of the mucosal physical barrier, nonspecific activation of the immune system, and mucosal innate cell activation and effector functions, are still not completely defined. In order to attain an effective manipulation of innate immune cells, aiming at the induction of an effective adaptive immunity against HIV, any information on the role of mucosal antiviral factors and innate immune cells will be very important. The aim of this review is to summarize the information onthe role of gamma/delta T-cells during HIV infection, from the general circulating population to mucosal sites, in order to better describe areas deserving increased attention. In particular, strategies enhancing gamma/delta T-cell functions may open the possibility to formulate new immunotherapeutic regimens, which could impact the improvement of immune control of HIV disease. © Permanyer Publications 2011.

Agrati, C., D'Offizi, G., Gougeon, M.-., Malkovsky, M., Sacchi, A., Casetti, R., et al. (2011). Innate gamma/delta T-cells during HIV infection: Terra relatively incognita in novel vaccination strategies?. AIDS REVIEWS, 13(1), 3-12.

Innate gamma/delta T-cells during HIV infection: Terra relatively incognita in novel vaccination strategies?

Sacchi A.;
2011

Abstract

Despite a long-lasting global effort, the Holy Grail quest for a protective vaccine, able to confer prevention to HIV infection, did not reach the hoped for results, nor seems able to do so in the near future. Since mucosal surfaces of the host serve as the main entry point for HIV, it seems now logical to switch from a systemic to a localized view of events, in order to reveal critical steps useful in designing new and different vaccination strategies. In this context, the recent description of the very early phases of infection, from the eclipse to the viremia peak phase, seems to define a point-of-no-return threshold after which the main HIV infection steps, i.e. the massive destruction of the CD4+CCR5+ cell pool, the destruction of the mucosal physical barrier, and the establishment of reservoir sanctuaries, have already been accomplished. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms, the timing, and the consequences of evasion mechanisms exploited by HIV are still under scrutiny. Innate immunity, as part of a rapid lymphoid stress surveillance system, is known to play a central role in host responses to many infectious agents. In particular, V©9V™2 T-cells are able to quickly respond to danger signals without the need for classical major histocompatibility complex presentation, and may act as a bridge between innate and acquired arms of immune response, being able to kill infected/transformed cells, release antimicrobial soluble factors, and increase the deployment of other innate and acquired responses. Many experimental evidences suggest a direct role of circulating V©9V™2 T-cells during HIV disease. They may exert a direct anti-HIV role by secreting chemokines competing for HIV entry coreceptors as well as other soluble antiviral factors, and by killing infected cells by cytotoxic natural killer-like mechanisms. Moreover, they were found progressively depleted and anergic in advanced stages of HIV disease, this effect being directly linked to uncontrolled HIV replication. Scarce evidences are available on the involvement of mucosal gamma/delta T-cells during the early phases of HIV infection. In particular, the relative cause/effect links between HIV infection, destruction of the mucosal physical barrier, nonspecific activation of the immune system, and mucosal innate cell activation and effector functions, are still not completely defined. In order to attain an effective manipulation of innate immune cells, aiming at the induction of an effective adaptive immunity against HIV, any information on the role of mucosal antiviral factors and innate immune cells will be very important. The aim of this review is to summarize the information onthe role of gamma/delta T-cells during HIV infection, from the general circulating population to mucosal sites, in order to better describe areas deserving increased attention. In particular, strategies enhancing gamma/delta T-cell functions may open the possibility to formulate new immunotherapeutic regimens, which could impact the improvement of immune control of HIV disease. © Permanyer Publications 2011.
Agrati, C., D'Offizi, G., Gougeon, M.-., Malkovsky, M., Sacchi, A., Casetti, R., et al. (2011). Innate gamma/delta T-cells during HIV infection: Terra relatively incognita in novel vaccination strategies?. AIDS REVIEWS, 13(1), 3-12.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11590/400086
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