Background: The changing diabetes in children (CDiC) project is a public-private partnership implemented by Novo Nordisk, to improve access to diabetes care for children with type 1 diabetes. This paper outlines the findings from an evaluation of CDiC in Bangladesh and Kenya, assessing whether CDiC has achieved its objectives in each of six core program components. Research design and methods: The Rapid Assessment Protocol for Insulin Access (RAPIA) framework was used to analyze the path of insulin provision and the healthcare infrastructure in place for diagnosis and treatment of diabetes. The RAPIA facilitates a mixed-methods approach to multiple levels of data collection and systems analysis. Information is collected through questionnaires, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions, site visits, and document reviews, engaging a wide range of stakeholders (N = 127). All transcripts were analyzed thematically. Results: The CDiC scheme provides a stable supply of free insulin to children in implementing facilities in Kenya and Bangladesh, and offers a comprehensive package of pediatric diabetes care. However, some elements of the CDiC program were not functioning as originally intended. Transitions away from donor funding and toward government ownership are a particular concern, as patients may incur additional treatment costs, while services offered may be reduced. Additionally, despite subsidized treatment costs, indirect costs remain a substantial barrier to care. Conclusion: Public-private partnerships such as the CDiC program can improve access to life-saving medicines. However, our analysis found several limitations, including concerns over the sustainability of the project in both countries. Any program reliant on external funding and delivered in a high-turnover staffing environment will be vulnerable to sustainability concerns.

Palmer, T., Jennings, H.M., Shannon, G., Salustri, F., Grewal, G., Chelagat, W., et al. (2022). Improving access to diabetes care for children: An evaluation of the changing diabetes in children project in Kenya and Bangladesh. PEDIATRIC DIABETES, 23(1), 19-32 [10.1111/pedi.13277].

Improving access to diabetes care for children: An evaluation of the changing diabetes in children project in Kenya and Bangladesh

Salustri F.;
2022

Abstract

Background: The changing diabetes in children (CDiC) project is a public-private partnership implemented by Novo Nordisk, to improve access to diabetes care for children with type 1 diabetes. This paper outlines the findings from an evaluation of CDiC in Bangladesh and Kenya, assessing whether CDiC has achieved its objectives in each of six core program components. Research design and methods: The Rapid Assessment Protocol for Insulin Access (RAPIA) framework was used to analyze the path of insulin provision and the healthcare infrastructure in place for diagnosis and treatment of diabetes. The RAPIA facilitates a mixed-methods approach to multiple levels of data collection and systems analysis. Information is collected through questionnaires, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions, site visits, and document reviews, engaging a wide range of stakeholders (N = 127). All transcripts were analyzed thematically. Results: The CDiC scheme provides a stable supply of free insulin to children in implementing facilities in Kenya and Bangladesh, and offers a comprehensive package of pediatric diabetes care. However, some elements of the CDiC program were not functioning as originally intended. Transitions away from donor funding and toward government ownership are a particular concern, as patients may incur additional treatment costs, while services offered may be reduced. Additionally, despite subsidized treatment costs, indirect costs remain a substantial barrier to care. Conclusion: Public-private partnerships such as the CDiC program can improve access to life-saving medicines. However, our analysis found several limitations, including concerns over the sustainability of the project in both countries. Any program reliant on external funding and delivered in a high-turnover staffing environment will be vulnerable to sustainability concerns.
Palmer, T., Jennings, H.M., Shannon, G., Salustri, F., Grewal, G., Chelagat, W., et al. (2022). Improving access to diabetes care for children: An evaluation of the changing diabetes in children project in Kenya and Bangladesh. PEDIATRIC DIABETES, 23(1), 19-32 [10.1111/pedi.13277].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11590/401413
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