Ant nest beetles (Carabidae, Paussinae, Paussini; Paussus) are renowned myrmecophiles, mostly known for their bizarre and diverse antennal shape. While little is known about their development, behavior and host range, we do know they spend most of their lives inside ant nests, feeding upon the hemolymph of ant brood and teneral workers. Recent findings suggest these beetles use a surprisingly complex strategy for interacting and deceiving ants. They have managed to break into multiple communication channels that ants use to recognize and communicate with one another in order to deceive the ants and profit from the rich resources of the nest. Mounting evidence from structural, chemical, acoustic, and behavioral studies support the hypothesis that Paussus is among the most highly integrated parasite of social insects known to date.

Moore, W., Scarparo, G., Di Giulio, A. (2022). Foe to frenemy: predacious ant nest beetles use multiple strategies to fully integrate into ant nests. CURRENT OPINION IN INSECT SCIENCE, 52, 100921 [10.1016/j.cois.2022.100921].

Foe to frenemy: predacious ant nest beetles use multiple strategies to fully integrate into ant nests

Di Giulio, Andrea
2022

Abstract

Ant nest beetles (Carabidae, Paussinae, Paussini; Paussus) are renowned myrmecophiles, mostly known for their bizarre and diverse antennal shape. While little is known about their development, behavior and host range, we do know they spend most of their lives inside ant nests, feeding upon the hemolymph of ant brood and teneral workers. Recent findings suggest these beetles use a surprisingly complex strategy for interacting and deceiving ants. They have managed to break into multiple communication channels that ants use to recognize and communicate with one another in order to deceive the ants and profit from the rich resources of the nest. Mounting evidence from structural, chemical, acoustic, and behavioral studies support the hypothesis that Paussus is among the most highly integrated parasite of social insects known to date.
Moore, W., Scarparo, G., Di Giulio, A. (2022). Foe to frenemy: predacious ant nest beetles use multiple strategies to fully integrate into ant nests. CURRENT OPINION IN INSECT SCIENCE, 52, 100921 [10.1016/j.cois.2022.100921].
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11590/414487
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 0
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact