Riboflavin transporter deficiency (RTD) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by motor, sensory and cranial neuropathy. This childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease is caused by biallelic pathogenic variants in either SLC52A2 or SLC52A3 genes, resulting in insufficient supply of riboflavin (vitamin B2) and consequent impairment of flavoprotein-dependent metabolic pathways. Current therapy, empirically based high-dose riboflavin supplementation, ameliorates the progression of the disease, even though response to treatment is variable and partial. Recent studies have highlighted concurrent pathogenic contribution of cellular energy dysmetabolism and cytoskeletal derangement. In this context, patient specific RTD models, based on induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology, have provided evidence of redox imbalance, involving mitochondrial and peroxisomal dysfunction. Such oxidative stress condition likely causes cytoskeletal perturbation, associated with impaired differentiation of RTD motor neurons. In this review, we discuss the most recent findings obtained using different RTD models. Relevantly, the integration of data from innovative iPSC-derived in vitro models and invertebrate in vivo models may provide essential information on RTD pathophysiology. Such novel insights are expected to suggest custom therapeutic strategies, especially for those patients unresponsive to high-dose riboflavin treatments.

Colasuonno, F., Marioli, C., Tartaglia, M., Bertini, E., Compagnucci, C., & Moreno, S. (2022). New Insights into the Neurodegeneration Mechanisms Underlying Riboflavin Transporter Deficiency (RTD): Involvement of Energy Dysmetabolism and Cytoskeletal Derangement. BIOMEDICINES, 10(6), 1329 [10.3390/biomedicines10061329].

New Insights into the Neurodegeneration Mechanisms Underlying Riboflavin Transporter Deficiency (RTD): Involvement of Energy Dysmetabolism and Cytoskeletal Derangement

Colasuonno, Fiorella
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Marioli, Chiara
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Moreno, Sandra
Project Administration
2022

Abstract

Riboflavin transporter deficiency (RTD) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by motor, sensory and cranial neuropathy. This childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease is caused by biallelic pathogenic variants in either SLC52A2 or SLC52A3 genes, resulting in insufficient supply of riboflavin (vitamin B2) and consequent impairment of flavoprotein-dependent metabolic pathways. Current therapy, empirically based high-dose riboflavin supplementation, ameliorates the progression of the disease, even though response to treatment is variable and partial. Recent studies have highlighted concurrent pathogenic contribution of cellular energy dysmetabolism and cytoskeletal derangement. In this context, patient specific RTD models, based on induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology, have provided evidence of redox imbalance, involving mitochondrial and peroxisomal dysfunction. Such oxidative stress condition likely causes cytoskeletal perturbation, associated with impaired differentiation of RTD motor neurons. In this review, we discuss the most recent findings obtained using different RTD models. Relevantly, the integration of data from innovative iPSC-derived in vitro models and invertebrate in vivo models may provide essential information on RTD pathophysiology. Such novel insights are expected to suggest custom therapeutic strategies, especially for those patients unresponsive to high-dose riboflavin treatments.
Colasuonno, F., Marioli, C., Tartaglia, M., Bertini, E., Compagnucci, C., & Moreno, S. (2022). New Insights into the Neurodegeneration Mechanisms Underlying Riboflavin Transporter Deficiency (RTD): Involvement of Energy Dysmetabolism and Cytoskeletal Derangement. BIOMEDICINES, 10(6), 1329 [10.3390/biomedicines10061329].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11590/414848
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