Abstract Purpose – Though the circular economy (CE) is a current buzzword, this still lacks a precise definition. In the absence of a clear notion of what that term includes, actions taken by the government and companies may not be well informed. In particular, those actions need to consider what people mean when people talk about the CE, either to refocus people’s decisions or to undertake a more effective communications strategy. Design/methodology/approach – Since people voice people’s opinions mainly through social media nowadays, special attention has to be paid to discussions on those media. In this paper, the authors focus on Twitter as a popular social platform to deliver one’s thoughts quickly and fast. The authors’ research aim is to get the perceptions of people about the CE. After collecting more than 100,000 tweets over 16 weeks, the authors analyse those tweets to understand the public discussion about the CE. The authors conduct a frequency analysis of the most recurring words, including the words’ association with other words in the same context and categorise them into a set of topics. Findings – The authors show that the discussion focuses on the usage of resources and materials that heavily endanger sustainability, i.e. carbon and plastic and the harmful habit of wasting. On the other hand, the two most common good practices associated with the CE and sustainability emerge as recycling and reuse (the latter being mentioned far less). Also, the business side of the CE appears to be relevant. Research limitations/implications – The outcome of this analysis can drive suitable communication strategies by which companies and governments interested in the development of the CE can understand what is actually discussed on social media and call for the attention. Originality/value – This paper addresses the lack of a standard definition the authors highlighted in the Introduction. The results confirm that people understand CE by looking both at CE’s constituent activities and CE’s expected consequences, namely the reduction of waste, the transition to a green economy free of plastic and other pollutants and the improvement of the world climate.

Mastroeni, L., Naldi, M., Vellucci, P. (2023). Twitter and the circular economy: Examining the public discourse. MANAGEMENT DECISION, 61(13), 192-221 [10.1108/MD-03-2022-0396].

Twitter and the circular economy: Examining the public discourse

Loretta Mastroeni;Pierluigi Vellucci
2023-01-01

Abstract

Abstract Purpose – Though the circular economy (CE) is a current buzzword, this still lacks a precise definition. In the absence of a clear notion of what that term includes, actions taken by the government and companies may not be well informed. In particular, those actions need to consider what people mean when people talk about the CE, either to refocus people’s decisions or to undertake a more effective communications strategy. Design/methodology/approach – Since people voice people’s opinions mainly through social media nowadays, special attention has to be paid to discussions on those media. In this paper, the authors focus on Twitter as a popular social platform to deliver one’s thoughts quickly and fast. The authors’ research aim is to get the perceptions of people about the CE. After collecting more than 100,000 tweets over 16 weeks, the authors analyse those tweets to understand the public discussion about the CE. The authors conduct a frequency analysis of the most recurring words, including the words’ association with other words in the same context and categorise them into a set of topics. Findings – The authors show that the discussion focuses on the usage of resources and materials that heavily endanger sustainability, i.e. carbon and plastic and the harmful habit of wasting. On the other hand, the two most common good practices associated with the CE and sustainability emerge as recycling and reuse (the latter being mentioned far less). Also, the business side of the CE appears to be relevant. Research limitations/implications – The outcome of this analysis can drive suitable communication strategies by which companies and governments interested in the development of the CE can understand what is actually discussed on social media and call for the attention. Originality/value – This paper addresses the lack of a standard definition the authors highlighted in the Introduction. The results confirm that people understand CE by looking both at CE’s constituent activities and CE’s expected consequences, namely the reduction of waste, the transition to a green economy free of plastic and other pollutants and the improvement of the world climate.
2023
Mastroeni, L., Naldi, M., Vellucci, P. (2023). Twitter and the circular economy: Examining the public discourse. MANAGEMENT DECISION, 61(13), 192-221 [10.1108/MD-03-2022-0396].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/439170
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