Road safety is a crucial aspect of global policies and management. Surrogate Safety Measures (SSMs) have gained attention in the study of pedestrian safety. This study aims to establish an effective SSM methodology to analyze driver-pedestrian interactions. The analysis relies on SSM indicators, without the need for an initial classification of driver-pedestrian interactions into specific interaction patterns. The proposed methodology offers several advantages, including the accurate identification of conflicts through an affordable approach making it easily accessible for public administrations and authorities to assess pedestrian safety at road intersections. A dataset comprising 270 driver-pedestrian interactions, observed at three road intersections in Rome, Italy, was examined. The severity level of each event was assessed through a preliminary classification of each interaction into three patterns: high, low, and none. Subsequently, the severity levels were evaluated using three methods, employing Time-to-Collision (TTC), Post-Encroachment Time (PET), and a combination of TTC and PET. A comparison between the severity levels identified by the two approaches was conducted. The findings reveal that Method 2, utilizing PET, consistently identifies conflicts. Additionally, a binomial logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the variables that influence the likelihood of an interaction escalating into a conflict. The results demonstrate that the probability of conflict increases with the duration of a red signal, particularly for younger pedestrians.

Gagliardi, V., Ferrante, C., Bella, F. (2024). Safety assessment of pedestrian-vehicle interaction at signalized intersections: An observational study. JOURNAL OF TRANSPORTATION SAFETY & SECURITY, 1-24 [10.1080/19439962.2023.2300280].

Safety assessment of pedestrian-vehicle interaction at signalized intersections: An observational study

Gagliardi, Valerio
;
Bella, Francesco
2024-01-01

Abstract

Road safety is a crucial aspect of global policies and management. Surrogate Safety Measures (SSMs) have gained attention in the study of pedestrian safety. This study aims to establish an effective SSM methodology to analyze driver-pedestrian interactions. The analysis relies on SSM indicators, without the need for an initial classification of driver-pedestrian interactions into specific interaction patterns. The proposed methodology offers several advantages, including the accurate identification of conflicts through an affordable approach making it easily accessible for public administrations and authorities to assess pedestrian safety at road intersections. A dataset comprising 270 driver-pedestrian interactions, observed at three road intersections in Rome, Italy, was examined. The severity level of each event was assessed through a preliminary classification of each interaction into three patterns: high, low, and none. Subsequently, the severity levels were evaluated using three methods, employing Time-to-Collision (TTC), Post-Encroachment Time (PET), and a combination of TTC and PET. A comparison between the severity levels identified by the two approaches was conducted. The findings reveal that Method 2, utilizing PET, consistently identifies conflicts. Additionally, a binomial logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the variables that influence the likelihood of an interaction escalating into a conflict. The results demonstrate that the probability of conflict increases with the duration of a red signal, particularly for younger pedestrians.
2024
Gagliardi, V., Ferrante, C., Bella, F. (2024). Safety assessment of pedestrian-vehicle interaction at signalized intersections: An observational study. JOURNAL OF TRANSPORTATION SAFETY & SECURITY, 1-24 [10.1080/19439962.2023.2300280].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/468808
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