Previous studies of the movie industry have raised questions concerning the problematic relationship between the success-related aspects of artistic excellence and commercial appeal. The present article proposes that-when the former is measured by industry recognition (Oscars and other awards) and the latter by market performance (box office and video rentals) and when the former hinges on the evaluative judgments of reviewers and consumers (ratings of excellence) and the latter on the level of buzz among these audience members (amount of attention, word of mouth, or click of mouse)-the two phenomena are essentially separable as independent paths to conceptually distinct and empirically uncorrelated aspects of motion-picture success. An analysis of data for 190 movies from the year 2003 shows that reviewer-and-consumer evaluations and buzz respond differently to a film's marketing clout (production budget, opening screens, and opening box office) and that these audience responses contribute independently to a film's industry recognition and market performance along two separable paths. These findings suggest various implications for movie marketers, film producers, actors or actresses, and other members of the motion-picture industry.

Holbrook, M.b., Addis, M. (2008). Art versus commerce in the movie industry: a Two-Path Model of Motion-Picture Success. JOURNAL OF CULTURAL ECONOMICS, 32(2), 87-107 [10.1007/s10824-007-9059-2].

Art versus commerce in the movie industry: a Two-Path Model of Motion-Picture Success

ADDIS, MICHELA
2008-01-01

Abstract

Previous studies of the movie industry have raised questions concerning the problematic relationship between the success-related aspects of artistic excellence and commercial appeal. The present article proposes that-when the former is measured by industry recognition (Oscars and other awards) and the latter by market performance (box office and video rentals) and when the former hinges on the evaluative judgments of reviewers and consumers (ratings of excellence) and the latter on the level of buzz among these audience members (amount of attention, word of mouth, or click of mouse)-the two phenomena are essentially separable as independent paths to conceptually distinct and empirically uncorrelated aspects of motion-picture success. An analysis of data for 190 movies from the year 2003 shows that reviewer-and-consumer evaluations and buzz respond differently to a film's marketing clout (production budget, opening screens, and opening box office) and that these audience responses contribute independently to a film's industry recognition and market performance along two separable paths. These findings suggest various implications for movie marketers, film producers, actors or actresses, and other members of the motion-picture industry.
2008
Holbrook, M.b., Addis, M. (2008). Art versus commerce in the movie industry: a Two-Path Model of Motion-Picture Success. JOURNAL OF CULTURAL ECONOMICS, 32(2), 87-107 [10.1007/s10824-007-9059-2].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/118624
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