The current global scene is characterized by a huge paradox: on one side, there is the scourge of poverty, on the other, 1.3 billion tonnes of food is wasted around the world every year. To address these problems, alternative distribution formats aimed at reducing food waste - and generating a positive social impact - are emerging, particularly food banks and social supermarkets. Recently, opportunities created by digital technology and the phenomenon of the sharing economy have boosted the increasing number of web platforms and food sharing apps that are being developed by existing organizations or by new entities that work exclusively online. The main aim of this research is to highlight – following an overview of existing food sharing models - how alternative distribution systems change in response to digitalization, and how the value propositions they claim change in the online context. A hierarchical cluster analysis based on a sample of 52 food sharing cases was carried out. Three categories of models have emerged: - the “sharing for money” model, which is primarily a B2C for-profit model to reduce waste and, at the same time, generate revenue; - the “sharing for charity” model in which food is collected and given to non-profit organizations; - the “sharing for the community” model which is a P2P model where food is shared amongst consumers. By way of conclusion we suggest that food bank seems to be replicated online in the same way in the online context (the “sharing for charity” model). However the model of the social supermarket does not seems to be replicated in the same way in the digital context, but changes towards a more profit oriented approach (the “sharing for money” model). Additionally, in the digital scenario, a new model emerges: the “sharing for the community”. Finally, the study highlights some preliminary evidences on the effects of the new forms of sharing on social inequality.

Michelini, L., Principato, L., Iasevoli, G. (2018). Understanding Food Sharing Models to Tackle Sustainability Challenges. ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS, 145, 205-217 [10.1016/j.ecolecon.2017.09.009].

Understanding Food Sharing Models to Tackle Sustainability Challenges

Principato, Ludovica;
2018-01-01

Abstract

The current global scene is characterized by a huge paradox: on one side, there is the scourge of poverty, on the other, 1.3 billion tonnes of food is wasted around the world every year. To address these problems, alternative distribution formats aimed at reducing food waste - and generating a positive social impact - are emerging, particularly food banks and social supermarkets. Recently, opportunities created by digital technology and the phenomenon of the sharing economy have boosted the increasing number of web platforms and food sharing apps that are being developed by existing organizations or by new entities that work exclusively online. The main aim of this research is to highlight – following an overview of existing food sharing models - how alternative distribution systems change in response to digitalization, and how the value propositions they claim change in the online context. A hierarchical cluster analysis based on a sample of 52 food sharing cases was carried out. Three categories of models have emerged: - the “sharing for money” model, which is primarily a B2C for-profit model to reduce waste and, at the same time, generate revenue; - the “sharing for charity” model in which food is collected and given to non-profit organizations; - the “sharing for the community” model which is a P2P model where food is shared amongst consumers. By way of conclusion we suggest that food bank seems to be replicated online in the same way in the online context (the “sharing for charity” model). However the model of the social supermarket does not seems to be replicated in the same way in the digital context, but changes towards a more profit oriented approach (the “sharing for money” model). Additionally, in the digital scenario, a new model emerges: the “sharing for the community”. Finally, the study highlights some preliminary evidences on the effects of the new forms of sharing on social inequality.
Michelini, L., Principato, L., Iasevoli, G. (2018). Understanding Food Sharing Models to Tackle Sustainability Challenges. ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS, 145, 205-217 [10.1016/j.ecolecon.2017.09.009].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11590/332711
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