Social rewards are fundamental to survival and overall health. Several studies suggest that adequate social stimuli during early life are critical for developing appropriate socioemotional and cognitive skills, whereas adverse social experiences negatively affect the proper development of brain and behavior, by increasing the susceptibility to develop neuropsychiatric conditions. Therefore, a better understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying social interactions, and their rewarding components in particular, is an important challenge of current neuroscience research. In this context, preclinical research has a crucial role: Animal models allow to investigate the neurobiological aspects of social reward in order to shed light on possible neurochemical alterations causing aberrant social reward processing in neuropsychiatric diseases, and they allow to test the validity and safety of innovative therapeutic strategies. Here, we discuss preclinical research that has investigated the rewarding properties of two forms of social interaction that occur in different phases of the lifespan of mammals, that is, mother–infant interaction and social interactions with peers, by focusing on the main neurotransmitter systems mediating their rewarding components. Together, the research performed so far helped to elucidate the mechanisms of social reward and its psychobiological components throughout development, thus increasing our understanding of the neurobiological substrates sustaining social functioning in health conditions and social dysfunction in major psychiatric disorders. (Figure presented.).

Manduca, A., Carbone, E., Schiavi, S., Cacchione, C., Buzzelli, V., Campolongo, P., et al. (2021). The neurochemistry of social reward during development: What have we learned from rodent models?. JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY, 157(5), 1408-1435 [10.1111/jnc.15321].

The neurochemistry of social reward during development: What have we learned from rodent models?

Manduca A.;Carbone E.;Cacchione C.;Buzzelli V.;Trezza V.
2021

Abstract

Social rewards are fundamental to survival and overall health. Several studies suggest that adequate social stimuli during early life are critical for developing appropriate socioemotional and cognitive skills, whereas adverse social experiences negatively affect the proper development of brain and behavior, by increasing the susceptibility to develop neuropsychiatric conditions. Therefore, a better understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying social interactions, and their rewarding components in particular, is an important challenge of current neuroscience research. In this context, preclinical research has a crucial role: Animal models allow to investigate the neurobiological aspects of social reward in order to shed light on possible neurochemical alterations causing aberrant social reward processing in neuropsychiatric diseases, and they allow to test the validity and safety of innovative therapeutic strategies. Here, we discuss preclinical research that has investigated the rewarding properties of two forms of social interaction that occur in different phases of the lifespan of mammals, that is, mother–infant interaction and social interactions with peers, by focusing on the main neurotransmitter systems mediating their rewarding components. Together, the research performed so far helped to elucidate the mechanisms of social reward and its psychobiological components throughout development, thus increasing our understanding of the neurobiological substrates sustaining social functioning in health conditions and social dysfunction in major psychiatric disorders. (Figure presented.).
Manduca, A., Carbone, E., Schiavi, S., Cacchione, C., Buzzelli, V., Campolongo, P., et al. (2021). The neurochemistry of social reward during development: What have we learned from rodent models?. JOURNAL OF NEUROCHEMISTRY, 157(5), 1408-1435 [10.1111/jnc.15321].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11590/398768
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